Genetic aspects of dilated cardiomyopathy

Rocio Ortiz-Lopez, Karla R. Schultz, Jeffrey Towbin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is characterized by ventricular dilatation and reduced systolic function, is the most common form of primary myocardial disease and the leading indication for cardiac transplantation. Although the majority of cases are described as idiopathic, a significant number are identified as being acquired due to an inflammatory response, and 20-30% are familial. Molecular biologic methods have been increasingly used during the past decade to attempt to better characterize the underlying etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms leading to both acquired and genetic forms of dilated cardiomyopathy. The aim of this chapter is to describe recent developments in the understanding of the inherited forms of this disease. This chapter will first describe the clinical aspects of dilated cardiomyopathy before outlining the progress currently being made in the genetic forms of dilated cardiomyopathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-82
Number of pages12
JournalProgress in Pediatric Cardiology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Heart Transplantation
Cardiomyopathies
Dilatation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Genetic aspects of dilated cardiomyopathy. / Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Schultz, Karla R.; Towbin, Jeffrey.

In: Progress in Pediatric Cardiology, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 71-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio ; Schultz, Karla R. ; Towbin, Jeffrey. / Genetic aspects of dilated cardiomyopathy. In: Progress in Pediatric Cardiology. 1996 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 71-82.
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