Genetic Correlates of Gene Expression in Recombinant Inbred Strains: A Relational Model System to Explore Neurobehavioral Phenotypes

Elissa J. Chesler, Jintao Wang, Lu Lu, Yanhua Qu, Kenneth F. Manly, Robert W. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Full genome sequencing, high-density genotyping, expanding sets of microarray assays, and systematic phenotyping of neuroanatomical and behavioral traits are producing a wealth of data on the mouse central nervous system (CNS). These disparate resources are still poorly integrated. One solution is to acquire these data using a common reference population of isogenic lines of mice, providing a point of integration between the data types. Recombinant inbred (RI) mice, derived through inbreeding of progeny from an inbred cross, are a powerful tool for complex trait mapping and analysis of the challenging phenotypes of neuroscientific interest. These isogenic RI lines are a retrievable genetic resource that can be repeatedly studied using a wide variety of assays. Diverse data sets can be related through fixed and known genomes, using tools such as the interactive web-based system for complex trait analysis, www.WebQTL.org. In this report, we demonstrate the use of WebQTL to explore complex interactions among a wide variety of traits-from mRNA transcripts to the impressive behavioral and pharmacological variation among RI strains. The relational approach exploiting a common set of strains facilitates study of multiple effects of single genes (pleiotropy) without a priori hypotheses required. Here we demonstrate the power of this technique through genetic correlation of gene expression with a database of neurobehavioral phenotypes collected in these strains of mice through more than 20 years of experimentation. By repeatedly studying the same panel of mice, early data can be re-examined in light of technological advances unforeseen at the time of their initial collection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-357
Number of pages15
JournalNeuroinformatics
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 11 2003

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Gene expression
Genes
Phenotype
Gene Expression
Assays
Neurology
Microarrays
Genome
Genetic Techniques
Inbreeding
Central Nervous System
Databases
Pharmacology
Messenger RNA
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Information Systems

Cite this

Genetic Correlates of Gene Expression in Recombinant Inbred Strains : A Relational Model System to Explore Neurobehavioral Phenotypes. / Chesler, Elissa J.; Wang, Jintao; Lu, Lu; Qu, Yanhua; Manly, Kenneth F.; Williams, Robert W.

In: Neuroinformatics, Vol. 1, No. 4, 11.11.2003, p. 343-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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