Genetic dissection of the mouse CNS using magnetic resonance microscopy

Alexandra Badea, G. Allan Johnson, Robert Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Advances in magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) make it practical to map gene variants responsible for structural variation in brains of many species, including mice and humans. We review results of a systematic genetic analysis of MRM data using as a case study a family of well characterized lines of mice. RECENT ADVANCES: MRM has matured to the point that we can generate high contrast, high-resolution images even for species as small as a mouse, with a brain merely 1/3000th the size of humans. We generated 21.5-micron data sets for a diverse panel of BXD mouse strains to gauge the extent of genetic variation, and as a prelude to comprehensive genetic and genomic analyses. Here we review MRM capabilities and image segmentation methods; heritability of brain variation; covariation of the sizes of brain regions; and correlations between MRM and classical histological data sets. SUMMARY: The combination of high throughput MRM and genomics will improve our understanding of the genetic basis of structure-function correlations. Sophisticated mouse models will be critical in converting correlations into mechanisms and in determining genetic and epigenetic causes of differences in disease susceptibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-386
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent opinion in neurology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

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Dissection
Microscopy
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Brain
Genetic Structures
Disease Susceptibility
Genomics
Epigenomics
Genes
Datasets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Genetic dissection of the mouse CNS using magnetic resonance microscopy. / Badea, Alexandra; Johnson, G. Allan; Williams, Robert.

In: Current opinion in neurology, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.08.2009, p. 379-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Badea, Alexandra ; Johnson, G. Allan ; Williams, Robert. / Genetic dissection of the mouse CNS using magnetic resonance microscopy. In: Current opinion in neurology. 2009 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 379-386.
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