Genetic Factors in Cannabinoid Use and Dependence

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cannabinoid use and dependence are heritable traits controlled in part by genetic factors. Despite a high incidence of use worldwide, genes that contribute to the risk of problematic use and dependence remain enigmatic. Here we review human candidate gene association studies, family-based linkage studies, and genome-wide association studies completed within the last two decades. These studies have expanded the list of candidate genes and intervals. However, there is little overlap between studies and generally low reproducibility in independent samples. Reasons for this lack of coherence vary but may depend on low sample size and statistical power, and the fact that most studies leverage populations ascertained for drug dependence other than cannabis. However, recent well-powered studies on lifetime cannabis use demonstrate that the genetic architecture of cannabis use resembles that of other substance use disorders and psychiatric disease in that many small effect genes contribute in an additive fashion. This finding suggests that increasing sample size and more focused recruitment of individuals based on cannabinoid use and dependence will identify more candidate genes. Follow-up of existing high priority candidates in preclinical model systems will facilitate better understanding of the genetic architecture and genetic risk factors for cannabis use and dependence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages129-150
Number of pages22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1162
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Cannabinoids
Genome-Wide Association Study
Cannabis
Genes
Sample Size
Substance-Related Disorders
Marijuana Abuse
Genetic Association Studies
Switzerland
Psychiatry
Genetics
Incidence
Population
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Mulligan, M. (2019). Genetic Factors in Cannabinoid Use and Dependence. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 129-150). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1162). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21737-2_7

Genetic Factors in Cannabinoid Use and Dependence. / Mulligan, Megan.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2019. p. 129-150 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1162).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Mulligan, M 2019, Genetic Factors in Cannabinoid Use and Dependence. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1162, Springer New York LLC, pp. 129-150. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21737-2_7
Mulligan M. Genetic Factors in Cannabinoid Use and Dependence. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC. 2019. p. 129-150. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21737-2_7
Mulligan, Megan. / Genetic Factors in Cannabinoid Use and Dependence. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2019. pp. 129-150 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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