Genetic influence on dental arch form in orthodontic patients

Kevin M. Cassidy, Edward Harris, Elizabeth Tolley, Robert G. Keim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human arch form varies considerably. This study analyzed the size and shape of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 320 adolescents from 155 sibships. A broad battery of measurements (k = 48) was computer-generated from Cartesian coordinates of cusp tips and line angles of the permanent teeth, and heritability estimates were generated from intraclass correlations, controlling for sex and age where indicated. Arch size has a modest genetic component, on the order of 50%, although this estimate may contain shared environmental influences. Tooth rotations have low h2 estimates, most of them indistinguishable from zero. Arch shape, assessed as length-width ratios, also has a modest transmissible component, suggesting that arch length and width growth factors are largely independent. Highest heritability estimates, as a group, were for transverse arch widths, which averaged about 60%. Several measures of left-right asymmetry also were analyzed (k = 31), and, while the arches are systematically asymmetric (generally with left > right), there is only weak evidence of a transmissible component for directional asymmetry and essentially none for fluctuating asymmetry. In all, arch size and shape are seen to be more subject to environmental influences than to heredity. These findings direct attention toward the need to better understand what extrinsic factors modulate arch size and shape during development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-454
Number of pages10
JournalAngle Orthodontist
Volume68
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998

Fingerprint

Dental Arch
Orthodontics
Tooth
Heredity
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Genetic influence on dental arch form in orthodontic patients. / Cassidy, Kevin M.; Harris, Edward; Tolley, Elizabeth; Keim, Robert G.

In: Angle Orthodontist, Vol. 68, No. 5, 01.10.1998, p. 445-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cassidy, Kevin M. ; Harris, Edward ; Tolley, Elizabeth ; Keim, Robert G. / Genetic influence on dental arch form in orthodontic patients. In: Angle Orthodontist. 1998 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 445-454.
@article{59db5c52708a43dfbf5dff097bcc7f38,
title = "Genetic influence on dental arch form in orthodontic patients",
abstract = "Human arch form varies considerably. This study analyzed the size and shape of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 320 adolescents from 155 sibships. A broad battery of measurements (k = 48) was computer-generated from Cartesian coordinates of cusp tips and line angles of the permanent teeth, and heritability estimates were generated from intraclass correlations, controlling for sex and age where indicated. Arch size has a modest genetic component, on the order of 50{\%}, although this estimate may contain shared environmental influences. Tooth rotations have low h2 estimates, most of them indistinguishable from zero. Arch shape, assessed as length-width ratios, also has a modest transmissible component, suggesting that arch length and width growth factors are largely independent. Highest heritability estimates, as a group, were for transverse arch widths, which averaged about 60{\%}. Several measures of left-right asymmetry also were analyzed (k = 31), and, while the arches are systematically asymmetric (generally with left > right), there is only weak evidence of a transmissible component for directional asymmetry and essentially none for fluctuating asymmetry. In all, arch size and shape are seen to be more subject to environmental influences than to heredity. These findings direct attention toward the need to better understand what extrinsic factors modulate arch size and shape during development.",
author = "Cassidy, {Kevin M.} and Edward Harris and Elizabeth Tolley and Keim, {Robert G.}",
year = "1998",
month = "10",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "445--454",
journal = "Angle Orthodontist",
issn = "0003-3219",
publisher = "E H Angle Orthodontists Research & Education Foundation, Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic influence on dental arch form in orthodontic patients

AU - Cassidy, Kevin M.

AU - Harris, Edward

AU - Tolley, Elizabeth

AU - Keim, Robert G.

PY - 1998/10/1

Y1 - 1998/10/1

N2 - Human arch form varies considerably. This study analyzed the size and shape of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 320 adolescents from 155 sibships. A broad battery of measurements (k = 48) was computer-generated from Cartesian coordinates of cusp tips and line angles of the permanent teeth, and heritability estimates were generated from intraclass correlations, controlling for sex and age where indicated. Arch size has a modest genetic component, on the order of 50%, although this estimate may contain shared environmental influences. Tooth rotations have low h2 estimates, most of them indistinguishable from zero. Arch shape, assessed as length-width ratios, also has a modest transmissible component, suggesting that arch length and width growth factors are largely independent. Highest heritability estimates, as a group, were for transverse arch widths, which averaged about 60%. Several measures of left-right asymmetry also were analyzed (k = 31), and, while the arches are systematically asymmetric (generally with left > right), there is only weak evidence of a transmissible component for directional asymmetry and essentially none for fluctuating asymmetry. In all, arch size and shape are seen to be more subject to environmental influences than to heredity. These findings direct attention toward the need to better understand what extrinsic factors modulate arch size and shape during development.

AB - Human arch form varies considerably. This study analyzed the size and shape of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 320 adolescents from 155 sibships. A broad battery of measurements (k = 48) was computer-generated from Cartesian coordinates of cusp tips and line angles of the permanent teeth, and heritability estimates were generated from intraclass correlations, controlling for sex and age where indicated. Arch size has a modest genetic component, on the order of 50%, although this estimate may contain shared environmental influences. Tooth rotations have low h2 estimates, most of them indistinguishable from zero. Arch shape, assessed as length-width ratios, also has a modest transmissible component, suggesting that arch length and width growth factors are largely independent. Highest heritability estimates, as a group, were for transverse arch widths, which averaged about 60%. Several measures of left-right asymmetry also were analyzed (k = 31), and, while the arches are systematically asymmetric (generally with left > right), there is only weak evidence of a transmissible component for directional asymmetry and essentially none for fluctuating asymmetry. In all, arch size and shape are seen to be more subject to environmental influences than to heredity. These findings direct attention toward the need to better understand what extrinsic factors modulate arch size and shape during development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032185399&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032185399&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 445

EP - 454

JO - Angle Orthodontist

JF - Angle Orthodontist

SN - 0003-3219

IS - 5

ER -