Genetic testing for early-onset alzheimer disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The availability of testing for identified risk genes for Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with clinically probable AD or their at-risk family members raises important questions for the neurologist. Because the potential benefits and risks of testing vary for each patient, physicians need to evaluate whether it is appropriate on a case-by-case basis. This article outlines the testing decision process and serves as a guide to assist clinicians with associated counseling and result disclosure. Because genetic testing is relatively new and preventive and therapeutic options for AD remain limited, it is important to remain sensitive to and understand the specific challenges associated with obtaining these tests in the routine clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-479
Number of pages5
JournalCONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

Fingerprint

Genetic Testing
Alzheimer Disease
Disclosure
Counseling
Physicians
Genes
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Genetic testing for early-onset alzheimer disease. / Tsao, Jack.

In: CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 475-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{12179410685347d08611570b8bc23402,
title = "Genetic testing for early-onset alzheimer disease",
abstract = "The availability of testing for identified risk genes for Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with clinically probable AD or their at-risk family members raises important questions for the neurologist. Because the potential benefits and risks of testing vary for each patient, physicians need to evaluate whether it is appropriate on a case-by-case basis. This article outlines the testing decision process and serves as a guide to assist clinicians with associated counseling and result disclosure. Because genetic testing is relatively new and preventive and therapeutic options for AD remain limited, it is important to remain sensitive to and understand the specific challenges associated with obtaining these tests in the routine clinical setting.",
author = "Jack Tsao",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1212/01.CON.0000429170.50686.4e",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "475--479",
journal = "CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology",
issn = "1080-2371",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic testing for early-onset alzheimer disease

AU - Tsao, Jack

PY - 2013/4/1

Y1 - 2013/4/1

N2 - The availability of testing for identified risk genes for Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with clinically probable AD or their at-risk family members raises important questions for the neurologist. Because the potential benefits and risks of testing vary for each patient, physicians need to evaluate whether it is appropriate on a case-by-case basis. This article outlines the testing decision process and serves as a guide to assist clinicians with associated counseling and result disclosure. Because genetic testing is relatively new and preventive and therapeutic options for AD remain limited, it is important to remain sensitive to and understand the specific challenges associated with obtaining these tests in the routine clinical setting.

AB - The availability of testing for identified risk genes for Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with clinically probable AD or their at-risk family members raises important questions for the neurologist. Because the potential benefits and risks of testing vary for each patient, physicians need to evaluate whether it is appropriate on a case-by-case basis. This article outlines the testing decision process and serves as a guide to assist clinicians with associated counseling and result disclosure. Because genetic testing is relatively new and preventive and therapeutic options for AD remain limited, it is important to remain sensitive to and understand the specific challenges associated with obtaining these tests in the routine clinical setting.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876365117&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84876365117&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1212/01.CON.0000429170.50686.4e

DO - 10.1212/01.CON.0000429170.50686.4e

M3 - Review article

VL - 19

SP - 475

EP - 479

JO - CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology

JF - CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology

SN - 1080-2371

IS - 2

ER -