Genetic Variation in the Social Environment Contributes to Health and Disease

Amelie Baud, Megan Mulligan, Francesco Paolo Casale, Jesse F. Ingels, Casey J. Bohl, Jacques Callebert, Jean Marie Launay, Jon Krohn, Andres Legarra, Robert Williams, Oliver Stegle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Assessing the impact of the social environment on health and disease is challenging. As social effects are in part determined by the genetic makeup of social partners, they can be studied from associations between genotypes of one individual and phenotype of another (social genetic effects, SGE, also called indirect genetic effects). For the first time we quantified the contribution of SGE to more than 100 organismal phenotypes and genome-wide gene expression measured in laboratory mice. We find that genetic variation in cage mates (i.e. SGE) contributes to variation in organismal and molecular measures related to anxiety, wound healing, immune function, and body weight. Social genetic effects explained up to 29% of phenotypic variance, and for several traits their contribution exceeded that of direct genetic effects (effects of an individual’s genotypes on its own phenotype). Importantly, we show that ignoring SGE can severely bias estimates of direct genetic effects (heritability). Thus SGE may be an important source of “missing heritability” in studies of complex traits in human populations. In summary, our study uncovers an important contribution of the social environment to phenotypic variation, sets the basis for using SGE to dissect social effects, and identifies an opportunity to improve studies of direct genetic effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1006498
JournalPLoS genetics
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

health and disease
social environment
Social Environment
genetic variation
Phenotype
Health
Genotype
phenotype
heritability
Wound Healing
phenotypic variation
genotype
Anxiety
Body Weight
Genome
Gene Expression
Population
gene expression
anxiety
genetic effect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Baud, A., Mulligan, M., Casale, F. P., Ingels, J. F., Bohl, C. J., Callebert, J., ... Stegle, O. (2017). Genetic Variation in the Social Environment Contributes to Health and Disease. PLoS genetics, 13(1), [e1006498]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006498

Genetic Variation in the Social Environment Contributes to Health and Disease. / Baud, Amelie; Mulligan, Megan; Casale, Francesco Paolo; Ingels, Jesse F.; Bohl, Casey J.; Callebert, Jacques; Launay, Jean Marie; Krohn, Jon; Legarra, Andres; Williams, Robert; Stegle, Oliver.

In: PLoS genetics, Vol. 13, No. 1, e1006498, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baud, A, Mulligan, M, Casale, FP, Ingels, JF, Bohl, CJ, Callebert, J, Launay, JM, Krohn, J, Legarra, A, Williams, R & Stegle, O 2017, 'Genetic Variation in the Social Environment Contributes to Health and Disease', PLoS genetics, vol. 13, no. 1, e1006498. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006498
Baud, Amelie ; Mulligan, Megan ; Casale, Francesco Paolo ; Ingels, Jesse F. ; Bohl, Casey J. ; Callebert, Jacques ; Launay, Jean Marie ; Krohn, Jon ; Legarra, Andres ; Williams, Robert ; Stegle, Oliver. / Genetic Variation in the Social Environment Contributes to Health and Disease. In: PLoS genetics. 2017 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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