Geographic analysis of health risks of pediatric lead exposure: A golden opportunity to promote healthy neighborhoods

Tonny Oyana, Florence M. Margai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this retrospective study, the authors investigated pediatric blood lead levels (BLLs) at 2 threshold levels in neighborhoods across the US city of Chicago, examining geographic associations with demographic risk factors and housing characteristics, using data from large-scale childhood BLL screening records from 1997 through 2003. They used logistic regression and geostatistical methods to assess disease dynamics and probability of elevated BLLs. The results showed a significant decline of elevated BLLs, with levels measured at ≥ 10 μg/dL decreasing by 74%, compared with a 40% decrease for the lower levels (6-9 μg/dL). The Westside and Southside neighborhoods, with a high concentration of minority populations, had the highest prevalence rates, which were significantly associated with living in pre-1950 housing units. The findings provided insights for lead prevention, implications for lowering the threshold limit, and suggestions for the urgent task of developing healthy neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-104
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Environmental and Occupational Health
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Health risks
health risk
Blood
blood
Health
risk factor
Logistics
logistics
Screening
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Demography
Lead
exposure
analysis
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Geographic analysis of health risks of pediatric lead exposure : A golden opportunity to promote healthy neighborhoods. / Oyana, Tonny; Margai, Florence M.

In: Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health, Vol. 62, No. 2, 01.01.2007, p. 93-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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