Geographic variations of childhood asthma hospitalization and outpatient visits and proximity to ambient pollution sources at a U.S.-Canada border crossing

Tonny Oyana, Patrick A. Rivers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Childhood asthma is a significant public health problem in the United States and evidence is accumulating regarding the contribution from traffic and ambient air pollution. This study is a companion piece of a related Buffalo asthma study in adults recently published in the July 2004 issue of American Journal of Public Health. This study focuses on children under 18 years of age diagnosed with asthma during a three-year period (2000-2002). In order to determine the effects of particulate air pollution on public health, we conducted an ecologic study of childhood asthma and point-source respirable particulate air pollution in patients diagnosed with asthma (n = 6,425). Patients diagnosed with gastroenteritis (n = 5,132) were used as controls. Results: Although the results of this study show spatial patterns similar to the ones observed in the adult study, a multiple-comparison test shows that EPA-designated focus sites located in Buffalo's east side are statistically (p < 0.008) more linked to childhood asthma than sites located elsewhere. Conclusions: Findings of this study can be useful in geographic targeting and in the design of optimal and preventive measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number14
JournalInternational Journal of Health Geographics
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2005

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Emigration and Immigration
Public health
Air pollution
Canada
Hospitalization
Pollution
Outpatients
Asthma
Air Pollution
Public Health
Buffaloes
Medical problems
Gastroenteritis
Outpatient
Childhood
Proximity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Computer Science(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Childhood asthma is a significant public health problem in the United States and evidence is accumulating regarding the contribution from traffic and ambient air pollution. This study is a companion piece of a related Buffalo asthma study in adults recently published in the July 2004 issue of American Journal of Public Health. This study focuses on children under 18 years of age diagnosed with asthma during a three-year period (2000-2002). In order to determine the effects of particulate air pollution on public health, we conducted an ecologic study of childhood asthma and point-source respirable particulate air pollution in patients diagnosed with asthma (n = 6,425). Patients diagnosed with gastroenteritis (n = 5,132) were used as controls. Results: Although the results of this study show spatial patterns similar to the ones observed in the adult study, a multiple-comparison test shows that EPA-designated focus sites located in Buffalo's east side are statistically (p < 0.008) more linked to childhood asthma than sites located elsewhere. Conclusions: Findings of this study can be useful in geographic targeting and in the design of optimal and preventive measures.",
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