Geometry of anterior open bite correction

Zachary R. Abramson, Srinivas M. Susarla, Matthew E. Lawler, Asim Choudhri, Zachary S. Peacock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Correction of anterior open bite is a frequently encountered and challenging problem for the craniomaxillofacial surgeon and orthodontist. Accurate clinical evaluation, including cephalometric assessment, is paramount for establishing the diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan. The purposes of this technical note were to discuss the basic geometric principles involved in the surgical correction of skeletal anterior open bites and to offer a simple mathematical model for predicting the amount of posterior maxillary impaction with concomitant mandibular rotation required to establish an adequate overbite. Using standard geometric principles, a mathematical model was created to demonstrate the relationship between the magnitude of the open bite and the magnitude of the rotational movements required for correction. This model was then validated using a clinical case. In summary, the amount of open bite closure for a given amount of posterior maxillary impaction depends on anatomic variables, which can be obtained from a lateral cephalogram. The clinical implication of this relationship is as follows: patients with small mandibles and steep mandibular occlusal planes will require greater amounts of posterior impaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e223-e225
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Open Bite
Theoretical Models
Cephalometry
Overbite
Dental Occlusion
Mandible

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Abramson, Z. R., Susarla, S. M., Lawler, M. E., Choudhri, A., & Peacock, Z. S. (2015). Geometry of anterior open bite correction. Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 26(3), e223-e225. https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000001440

Geometry of anterior open bite correction. / Abramson, Zachary R.; Susarla, Srinivas M.; Lawler, Matthew E.; Choudhri, Asim; Peacock, Zachary S.

In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. e223-e225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abramson, ZR, Susarla, SM, Lawler, ME, Choudhri, A & Peacock, ZS 2015, 'Geometry of anterior open bite correction', Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. e223-e225. https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000001440
Abramson, Zachary R. ; Susarla, Srinivas M. ; Lawler, Matthew E. ; Choudhri, Asim ; Peacock, Zachary S. / Geometry of anterior open bite correction. In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. e223-e225.
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