Gestural recovery and the role of forward and reversed syllabic repetitions as stuttering inhibitors in adults

Joseph Kalinowski, Tim Saltuklaroglu, Vijaya Guntupalli, Andrew Stuart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Instead of being the core stuttering 'problem', syllabic repetitions may be a biological mechanism, or 'solution', to the central involuntary stuttering block. Simply put, stuttering is an endogenous transitory state of 'shadowed speech', a choral speech derivative that allows for a neural release of the central block. To investigate this possibility, 14 adults who stutter read while listening to forward fluent speech, reversed fluent speech, forward stuttered speech, and reversed stuttered speech. All conditions induced significant degrees of stuttering inhibition when compared to a control condition. However, the reversed fluent condition was less powerful than the other three conditions (∼42% vs. ∼65%) for inhibiting stuttering. Stuttering inhibition appears to proceed by 'gestural recovery', made possible by the presence of an exogenous or 'second' set of speech gestures and engagement of mirror neurons. When reversed fluent speech was used, violations in normal gesture-time relationships (i.e., normal speech entropy) resulted in gestural configurations that apparently were inadequately recovered, and therefore, were not as conducive to high levels of stuttering inhibition. In contrast, high levels of encoding found in the simple syllabic structures of stuttered speech allowed its forward and reversed forms to be equally effective for gestural recovery and stuttering inhibition. The reversal of repeated syllables did not appear to significantly degrade the natural gesture-time relationships (i.e., they were perceptually recognizable). Thus, exogenous speech gestures that displayed near normal gestural relationships allowed for easy recovery and fluent productions via mirror systems, suggesting a more choral-like nature. The importance of syllabic repetitions is highlighted: both their perceived (exogenous) and produced (endogenous) forms appear to be fundamental, surface acoustic manifestations for central stuttering inhibition via the engagement of mirror neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-149
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume363
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2004

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Stuttering
Gestures
Mirror Neurons
Entropy
Acoustics
Inhibition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Gestural recovery and the role of forward and reversed syllabic repetitions as stuttering inhibitors in adults. / Kalinowski, Joseph; Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Guntupalli, Vijaya; Stuart, Andrew.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 363, No. 2, 10.06.2004, p. 144-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kalinowski, Joseph ; Saltuklaroglu, Tim ; Guntupalli, Vijaya ; Stuart, Andrew. / Gestural recovery and the role of forward and reversed syllabic repetitions as stuttering inhibitors in adults. In: Neuroscience Letters. 2004 ; Vol. 363, No. 2. pp. 144-149.
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