Get fit with the grizzlies

A community-school-home initiative to fight childhood obesity

Carol C. Irwin, Richard L. Irwin, Maureen E. Miller, Grant W. Somes, Phyllis Richey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Professional sport organizations in the United States have notable celebrity status, and several teams have used this " star power" to collaborate with local school districts toward the goal of affecting children's health. Program effectiveness is unknown due to the absence of comprehensive evaluations for these initiatives. The Memphis Grizzlies, the city's National Basketball Association franchise, launched " Get Fit with the Grizzlies," a 6-week, curricular addition focusing on nutrition and physical activity for the fourth and fifth grades in Memphis City Schools (MCS). The health-infused mini-unit was delivered by physical education teachers during their classes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the " Get Fit" program effectiveness.Methods: Survey research was employed which measured health knowledge acquisition and health behavior change using a matched pre/posttest design in randomly chosen schools (n = 11) from all elementary schools in the MCS system (N = 110). The total number of matched pre/posttests (n = 888) equaled approximately 5% of the total fourth-/fifth-grade population. McNemar's test for significance (p < .05) was applied. Odds ratios were calculated for each question.Results: Analyses confirmed that there was significant health knowledge acquisition (7 of 8 questions) with odds ratios confirming moderate to strong associations. Seven out of 10 health behavior change questions significantly improved after intervention, whereas odds ratios indicated a low level of association after intervention.Conclusions: This community-school-home initiative using a professional team's celebrity platform within a certain locale is largely overlooked by school districts and should be considered as a positive strategy to confront childhood obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-339
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume80
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
childhood
school
knowledge acquisition
community
VIP
health behavior
health
Odds Ratio
Health Behavior
Program Evaluation
district
professional sports
Health
survey research
school system
physical education
Basketball
nutrition
elementary school

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Get fit with the grizzlies : A community-school-home initiative to fight childhood obesity. / Irwin, Carol C.; Irwin, Richard L.; Miller, Maureen E.; Somes, Grant W.; Richey, Phyllis.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 80, No. 7, 01.07.2010, p. 333-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Irwin, Carol C. ; Irwin, Richard L. ; Miller, Maureen E. ; Somes, Grant W. ; Richey, Phyllis. / Get fit with the grizzlies : A community-school-home initiative to fight childhood obesity. In: Journal of School Health. 2010 ; Vol. 80, No. 7. pp. 333-339.
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