Glenohumeral biomechanics of physical therapy mobilization techniques

Hunter Smith, Daniel M. Wido, Richard Kasser, Jon Rose, Denis Diangelo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical therapists employ mobilization techniques for restoring range of motion. The objective was to develop a protocol for quantifying and comparing glenohumeral (GH) joint mobilization techniques performed by physical therapists in a human cadaveric model. Two different GH joint positions were investigated using grade IV nonoscillatory mobilizations. One right human cadaveric shoulder (Age:52, MALE) was procured. The scapula was mounted in an upright neutral position to a 6 axis load cell with the humerus freely suspended. GH motion was recorded in three dimensions. Rotator cuff muscle tone (subscapularis, supraspinatus, and teres minor/infraspinatus) was simulated using static 5 N loads. Two experienced physical therapists performed three sets of posterior (P), anterior (A) and inferior (I) glides from neutral and resting positions. Force and displacement measurements were collected at 20Hz and 10Hz, respectively, and used to determine GH three-dimensional stiffness. The mean three-dimensional stiffness values (N/mm) in neutral and resting positions were: Therapist One: A:1.87/2.28, P:1.43/3.62, I:0.83/1.08 and Therapist Two: A:1.87/1.81, P:1.24/6.66, I:0.98/0.71). Most notable differences between joint position and therapists occurred during posterior glide mobilization. In addition to studying other GH mobilization techniques the protocol can be used to determine structural tissue properties and/or measure effects of shoulder injuries on GH biomechanics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013
Pages69-70
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 5 2013
Event29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013 - Miami, FL, United States
Duration: May 3 2013May 5 2013

Other

Other29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityMiami, FL
Period5/3/135/5/13

Fingerprint

Physical therapy
Biomechanics
Stiffness
Displacement measurement
Force measurement
Muscle
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Smith, H., Wido, D. M., Kasser, R., Rose, J., & Diangelo, D. (2013). Glenohumeral biomechanics of physical therapy mobilization techniques. In Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013 (pp. 69-70). [6525680] https://doi.org/10.1109/SBEC.2013.43

Glenohumeral biomechanics of physical therapy mobilization techniques. / Smith, Hunter; Wido, Daniel M.; Kasser, Richard; Rose, Jon; Diangelo, Denis.

Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013. 2013. p. 69-70 6525680.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Smith, H, Wido, DM, Kasser, R, Rose, J & Diangelo, D 2013, Glenohumeral biomechanics of physical therapy mobilization techniques. in Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013., 6525680, pp. 69-70, 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013, Miami, FL, United States, 5/3/13. https://doi.org/10.1109/SBEC.2013.43
Smith H, Wido DM, Kasser R, Rose J, Diangelo D. Glenohumeral biomechanics of physical therapy mobilization techniques. In Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013. 2013. p. 69-70. 6525680 https://doi.org/10.1109/SBEC.2013.43
Smith, Hunter ; Wido, Daniel M. ; Kasser, Richard ; Rose, Jon ; Diangelo, Denis. / Glenohumeral biomechanics of physical therapy mobilization techniques. Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013. 2013. pp. 69-70
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