Globose basal cells are required for reconstitution of olfactory epithelium after methyl bromide lesion

Woochan Jang, Steven Youngentob, James E. Schwob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite a remarkable regenerative capacity, recovery of the mammalian olfactory epithelium can fail in severely injured areas, which subsequently reconstitute as aneuronal respiratory epithelium (metaplasia). We contrasted the cellular response of areas of the rat epithelium that recover as olfactory after methyl bromide lesion with those undergoing respiratory metaplasia in order to identify stem cells that restore lesioned epithelium as olfactory. Ventral olfactory epithelium is at particular risk for metaplasia after lesion and patches of it are rendered acellular by methyl bromide exposure. In contrast, globose basal cells (GBCs, marked by staining with GBC-2) are preserved in surrounding ventral areas and uniformly throughout dorsal epithelium, which consistently and completely recovers as olfactory after lesion. Over the next few days, neurons reappear, but only in those areas in which GBCs are preserved and multiply. In contrast, parts of the epithelium in which GBCs are destroyed are repopulated in part by Bowman's gland cells, which pile up above the basal lamina. Electron microscopy confirms the reciprocity between gland cells and globose basal cells. By 14 days after lesion, the areas that are undergoing metaplasia are repopulated by typical respiratory epithelial cells. As horizontal basal cells are eliminated from all parts of the ventral epithelium, the data suggest that GBC-2(+) cells are ultimately responsible for regenerating olfactory neuroepithelium. In contrast, GLA-13(+) cells may give rise to respiratory metaplastic epithelium where GBCs are eliminated. Thus, we support the idea that a subpopulation of GBCs is the neural stem cell of the olfactory epithelium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-140
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume460
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 19 2003

Fingerprint

methyl bromide
Olfactory Mucosa
Metaplasia
Epithelium
Respiratory Mucosa
Neural Stem Cells
Basement Membrane

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Globose basal cells are required for reconstitution of olfactory epithelium after methyl bromide lesion. / Jang, Woochan; Youngentob, Steven; Schwob, James E.

In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 460, No. 1, 19.05.2003, p. 123-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8e27c77e84e94dc3a53278957f8a27bc,
title = "Globose basal cells are required for reconstitution of olfactory epithelium after methyl bromide lesion",
abstract = "Despite a remarkable regenerative capacity, recovery of the mammalian olfactory epithelium can fail in severely injured areas, which subsequently reconstitute as aneuronal respiratory epithelium (metaplasia). We contrasted the cellular response of areas of the rat epithelium that recover as olfactory after methyl bromide lesion with those undergoing respiratory metaplasia in order to identify stem cells that restore lesioned epithelium as olfactory. Ventral olfactory epithelium is at particular risk for metaplasia after lesion and patches of it are rendered acellular by methyl bromide exposure. In contrast, globose basal cells (GBCs, marked by staining with GBC-2) are preserved in surrounding ventral areas and uniformly throughout dorsal epithelium, which consistently and completely recovers as olfactory after lesion. Over the next few days, neurons reappear, but only in those areas in which GBCs are preserved and multiply. In contrast, parts of the epithelium in which GBCs are destroyed are repopulated in part by Bowman's gland cells, which pile up above the basal lamina. Electron microscopy confirms the reciprocity between gland cells and globose basal cells. By 14 days after lesion, the areas that are undergoing metaplasia are repopulated by typical respiratory epithelial cells. As horizontal basal cells are eliminated from all parts of the ventral epithelium, the data suggest that GBC-2(+) cells are ultimately responsible for regenerating olfactory neuroepithelium. In contrast, GLA-13(+) cells may give rise to respiratory metaplastic epithelium where GBCs are eliminated. Thus, we support the idea that a subpopulation of GBCs is the neural stem cell of the olfactory epithelium.",
author = "Woochan Jang and Steven Youngentob and Schwob, {James E.}",
year = "2003",
month = "5",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1002/cne.10642",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "460",
pages = "123--140",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Neurology",
issn = "0021-9967",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Globose basal cells are required for reconstitution of olfactory epithelium after methyl bromide lesion

AU - Jang, Woochan

AU - Youngentob, Steven

AU - Schwob, James E.

PY - 2003/5/19

Y1 - 2003/5/19

N2 - Despite a remarkable regenerative capacity, recovery of the mammalian olfactory epithelium can fail in severely injured areas, which subsequently reconstitute as aneuronal respiratory epithelium (metaplasia). We contrasted the cellular response of areas of the rat epithelium that recover as olfactory after methyl bromide lesion with those undergoing respiratory metaplasia in order to identify stem cells that restore lesioned epithelium as olfactory. Ventral olfactory epithelium is at particular risk for metaplasia after lesion and patches of it are rendered acellular by methyl bromide exposure. In contrast, globose basal cells (GBCs, marked by staining with GBC-2) are preserved in surrounding ventral areas and uniformly throughout dorsal epithelium, which consistently and completely recovers as olfactory after lesion. Over the next few days, neurons reappear, but only in those areas in which GBCs are preserved and multiply. In contrast, parts of the epithelium in which GBCs are destroyed are repopulated in part by Bowman's gland cells, which pile up above the basal lamina. Electron microscopy confirms the reciprocity between gland cells and globose basal cells. By 14 days after lesion, the areas that are undergoing metaplasia are repopulated by typical respiratory epithelial cells. As horizontal basal cells are eliminated from all parts of the ventral epithelium, the data suggest that GBC-2(+) cells are ultimately responsible for regenerating olfactory neuroepithelium. In contrast, GLA-13(+) cells may give rise to respiratory metaplastic epithelium where GBCs are eliminated. Thus, we support the idea that a subpopulation of GBCs is the neural stem cell of the olfactory epithelium.

AB - Despite a remarkable regenerative capacity, recovery of the mammalian olfactory epithelium can fail in severely injured areas, which subsequently reconstitute as aneuronal respiratory epithelium (metaplasia). We contrasted the cellular response of areas of the rat epithelium that recover as olfactory after methyl bromide lesion with those undergoing respiratory metaplasia in order to identify stem cells that restore lesioned epithelium as olfactory. Ventral olfactory epithelium is at particular risk for metaplasia after lesion and patches of it are rendered acellular by methyl bromide exposure. In contrast, globose basal cells (GBCs, marked by staining with GBC-2) are preserved in surrounding ventral areas and uniformly throughout dorsal epithelium, which consistently and completely recovers as olfactory after lesion. Over the next few days, neurons reappear, but only in those areas in which GBCs are preserved and multiply. In contrast, parts of the epithelium in which GBCs are destroyed are repopulated in part by Bowman's gland cells, which pile up above the basal lamina. Electron microscopy confirms the reciprocity between gland cells and globose basal cells. By 14 days after lesion, the areas that are undergoing metaplasia are repopulated by typical respiratory epithelial cells. As horizontal basal cells are eliminated from all parts of the ventral epithelium, the data suggest that GBC-2(+) cells are ultimately responsible for regenerating olfactory neuroepithelium. In contrast, GLA-13(+) cells may give rise to respiratory metaplastic epithelium where GBCs are eliminated. Thus, we support the idea that a subpopulation of GBCs is the neural stem cell of the olfactory epithelium.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0344492210&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0344492210&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cne.10642

DO - 10.1002/cne.10642

M3 - Article

VL - 460

SP - 123

EP - 140

JO - Journal of Comparative Neurology

JF - Journal of Comparative Neurology

SN - 0021-9967

IS - 1

ER -