Glucocorticoid rescue for late-phase acute respiratory distress syndrome in trauma/surgical critical care patients

Curt S. Koontz, K. Kye Higdon, Troy L. Ploger, Benjamin W. Dart IV, Charles M. Richart, Robert Maxwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-dose glucocorticoid therapy (GCT) for the late fibroproliferative phase of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is controversial and has shown mixed results in medical patients. No studies have evaluated GCT in trauma/surgical critical care patients. The purpose of this study is to review the outcomes of trauma/surgical critical care patients with refractory ARDS treated with GCT. From January 2001 through September 2005, a pharmacy log was used to identify critically ill trauma/surgical patients in refractory ARDS (7 males and 2 females) who received GCT in an attempt to salvage them. GCT consisted of 200 mg intravenous methylprednisolone bolus for one dose and then 3 mg/kg per day divided every 6 hours for 6 weeks or until weaned off the ventilator. All patients as well as the survivors were analyzed. Outcome data was analyzed with SPSS (Chicago, IL) and the paired sample test. A P value ≤0.05 was considered significant. Data is presented as mean ± standard deviation. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective chart review. Seven patients (6 males and 1 female; age, 31 ± 16 years) survived (78%), weaned off of the ventilator, and were discharged from the hospital. The 2 deaths were secondary to refractory respiratory failure as well as cardiac arrest (n = 1) and anoxic brain injury from septic hypotension (n = 1). In survivors (n = 7), hospital length of stay (LOS) and intensive care unit LOS was 71 ± 30 days and 53 ± 16 days, respectively. Duration of GCT administration was 17 ± 6.4 days (range, 11-30 days). Ventilator time before GCT, during GCT, and after GCT was 22 ± 8.4, 15 ± 7.5, and 1.6 ± 6.0 days, respectively. During GCT, 8 patients developed pneumonia, 5 had urinary tract infection, and 3 had bacteremia. All infections were effectively treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, except in one patient who died of sepsis. PaO2/FIO2 ratio just before and after GCT was 100 ± 36 and 247 ± 56, respectively (n = 7; P < 0.001). Sequential organ failure assessment score just before and after GCT was 9.1 ± 2.3 and 5.0 ± 1.6, respectively (n = 7; P < 0.001). GCT rescue may have a role in salvaging critically ill trauma/surgical critical care patients in late-stage ARDS. More patients, however, need to be studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)644-648
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume72
Issue number7
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Critical Care
Glucocorticoids
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Mechanical Ventilators
Length of Stay
Critical Illness
Survivors
Organ Dysfunction Scores
Research Ethics Committees
Methylprednisolone
Bacteremia
Heart Arrest
Urinary Tract Infections
Respiratory Insufficiency
Hypotension
Brain Injuries
Intensive Care Units
Sepsis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Koontz, C. S., Higdon, K. K., Ploger, T. L., Dart IV, B. W., Richart, C. M., & Maxwell, R. (2006). Glucocorticoid rescue for late-phase acute respiratory distress syndrome in trauma/surgical critical care patients. American Surgeon, 72(7), 644-648.

Glucocorticoid rescue for late-phase acute respiratory distress syndrome in trauma/surgical critical care patients. / Koontz, Curt S.; Higdon, K. Kye; Ploger, Troy L.; Dart IV, Benjamin W.; Richart, Charles M.; Maxwell, Robert.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 72, No. 7, 01.12.2006, p. 644-648.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koontz, CS, Higdon, KK, Ploger, TL, Dart IV, BW, Richart, CM & Maxwell, R 2006, 'Glucocorticoid rescue for late-phase acute respiratory distress syndrome in trauma/surgical critical care patients', American Surgeon, vol. 72, no. 7, pp. 644-648.
Koontz, Curt S. ; Higdon, K. Kye ; Ploger, Troy L. ; Dart IV, Benjamin W. ; Richart, Charles M. ; Maxwell, Robert. / Glucocorticoid rescue for late-phase acute respiratory distress syndrome in trauma/surgical critical care patients. In: American Surgeon. 2006 ; Vol. 72, No. 7. pp. 644-648.
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