Glutamine protects GI epithelial tight junctions

Radhakrishna Rao, Kamaljit Chaudhry

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

L-Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in blood stream accounting for 30-35 % of the amino acid nitrogen in plasma. It was classified as a non-essential amino acid because it can be readily synthesized in the body from glutamate by glutamine synthetase, which is expressed at high levels in skeletal muscle, liver, brain and stomach tissue. Intracellular concentration of L-glutamine ranges from 2 to 20 mM, and its concentration in the extracellular fluid varies from 0.5 to 0.8 mM. Under conditions of extreme physical exertion, trauma and severe infections, the rate of utilization of glutamine is more than its rate of synthesis, resulting in a significant decline in plasma glutamine concentration. Glutamine is an essential fuel for the gastrointestinal tract. It is required for the synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids and antioxidants, such as glutathione, and involved in the maintenance of acid-base balance with the release of ammonia during its metabolism. Under conditions of reduced plasma glutamine concentration, body depends on the exogenous glutamine to meet its requirements. Therefore, L-glutamine now is reclassified as a conditionally essential amino acid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGlutamine in Clinical Nutrition
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages323-337
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781493919321
ISBN (Print)9781493919314
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

tight junctions
Tight Junctions
Glutamine
glutamine
Amino acids
Plasmas
Nucleic acids
Antioxidants
Amino Acids
Metabolism
Liver
amino acids
Muscle
Ammonia
Brain
Blood
Tissue
Nitrogen
Proteins
Physical Exertion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Rao, R., & Chaudhry, K. (2015). Glutamine protects GI epithelial tight junctions. In Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition (pp. 323-337). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1932-1_25

Glutamine protects GI epithelial tight junctions. / Rao, Radhakrishna; Chaudhry, Kamaljit.

Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York, 2015. p. 323-337.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Rao, R & Chaudhry, K 2015, Glutamine protects GI epithelial tight junctions. in Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York, pp. 323-337. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1932-1_25
Rao R, Chaudhry K. Glutamine protects GI epithelial tight junctions. In Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York. 2015. p. 323-337 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1932-1_25
Rao, Radhakrishna ; Chaudhry, Kamaljit. / Glutamine protects GI epithelial tight junctions. Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York, 2015. pp. 323-337
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