Glycemic Control and Urinary Tract Infections in Women with Type 1 Diabetes

Results from the DCCT/EDIC

DCCT/EDIC Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose We examined the relationship between glycemic control and urinary tract infections in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Women enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study, the observational followup of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, were surveyed to assess the rate of physician diagnosed urinary tract infections in the preceding 12 months. The relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and number of urinary tract infections in the previous 12 months was assessed using a multivariable Poisson regression model. Results A total of 572 women were evaluated at year 17. Mean age was 50.7 ± 7.2 years, mean body mass index was 28.6 ± 5.9 kg/m2, mean type 1 diabetes duration was 29.8 ± 5.0 years and mean glycated hemoglobin was 8.0% ± 0.9%. Of these women 86 (15.0%) reported at least 1 physician diagnosed urinary tract infection during the last 12 months. Higher glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly associated with number of urinary tract infections such that for every unit increase (1%) in recent glycated hemoglobin level, there was a 21% (p=0.02) increase in urinary tract infection frequency in the previous 12 months after adjusting for race, hysterectomy status, urinary incontinence, sexual activity in the last 12 months, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, and nephropathy. Conclusions The frequency of urinary tract infections increases with poor glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes. This relationship is independent of other well described predictors of urinary tract infections and suggests that factors directly related to glycemic control may influence the risk of lower urinary tract infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1129-1135
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume196
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Urinary Tract Infections
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Diabetes Complications
Physicians
Urinary Incontinence
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Hysterectomy
Sexual Behavior
Observational Studies
Epidemiology
Body Mass Index

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Glycemic Control and Urinary Tract Infections in Women with Type 1 Diabetes : Results from the DCCT/EDIC. / DCCT/EDIC Research Group.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 196, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 1129-1135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Glycemic Control and Urinary Tract Infections in Women with Type 1 Diabetes: Results from the DCCT/EDIC",
abstract = "Purpose We examined the relationship between glycemic control and urinary tract infections in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Women enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study, the observational followup of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, were surveyed to assess the rate of physician diagnosed urinary tract infections in the preceding 12 months. The relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and number of urinary tract infections in the previous 12 months was assessed using a multivariable Poisson regression model. Results A total of 572 women were evaluated at year 17. Mean age was 50.7 ± 7.2 years, mean body mass index was 28.6 ± 5.9 kg/m2, mean type 1 diabetes duration was 29.8 ± 5.0 years and mean glycated hemoglobin was 8.0{\%} ± 0.9{\%}. Of these women 86 (15.0{\%}) reported at least 1 physician diagnosed urinary tract infection during the last 12 months. Higher glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly associated with number of urinary tract infections such that for every unit increase (1{\%}) in recent glycated hemoglobin level, there was a 21{\%} (p=0.02) increase in urinary tract infection frequency in the previous 12 months after adjusting for race, hysterectomy status, urinary incontinence, sexual activity in the last 12 months, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, and nephropathy. Conclusions The frequency of urinary tract infections increases with poor glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes. This relationship is independent of other well described predictors of urinary tract infections and suggests that factors directly related to glycemic control may influence the risk of lower urinary tract infections.",
author = "{DCCT/EDIC Research Group} and Lenherr, {Sara M.} and Clemens, {J. Quentin} and Braffett, {Barbara H.} and Cleary, {Patricia A.} and Dunn, {Rodney L.} and Hotaling, {James M.} and Jacobson, {Alan M.} and Catherine Kim and William Herman and Brown, {Jeanette S.} and Hunter Wessells and Sarma, {Aruna V.} and Nathan, {D. M.} and B. Zinman and O. Crofford and S. Genuth and J. Brown-Friday and J. Crandall and H. Engel and S. Engel and H. Martinez and M. Phillips and M. Reid and H. Shamoon and J. Sheindlin and R. Gubitosi-Klug and L. Mayer and S. Pendegast and H. Zegarra and D. Miller and L. Singerman and S. Smith-Brewer and M. Novak and J. Quin and M. Palmert and E. Brown and J. McConnell and P. Pugsley and P. Crawford and W. Dahms and D. Brillon and Lackaye, {M. E.} and S. Kiss and R. Chan and A. Orlin and M. Rubin and V. Reppucci and T. Lee and Edward Chaum and Anthony Patterson",
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T1 - Glycemic Control and Urinary Tract Infections in Women with Type 1 Diabetes

T2 - Results from the DCCT/EDIC

AU - DCCT/EDIC Research Group

AU - Lenherr, Sara M.

AU - Clemens, J. Quentin

AU - Braffett, Barbara H.

AU - Cleary, Patricia A.

AU - Dunn, Rodney L.

AU - Hotaling, James M.

AU - Jacobson, Alan M.

AU - Kim, Catherine

AU - Herman, William

AU - Brown, Jeanette S.

AU - Wessells, Hunter

AU - Sarma, Aruna V.

AU - Nathan, D. M.

AU - Zinman, B.

AU - Crofford, O.

AU - Genuth, S.

AU - Brown-Friday, J.

AU - Crandall, J.

AU - Engel, H.

AU - Engel, S.

AU - Martinez, H.

AU - Phillips, M.

AU - Reid, M.

AU - Shamoon, H.

AU - Sheindlin, J.

AU - Gubitosi-Klug, R.

AU - Mayer, L.

AU - Pendegast, S.

AU - Zegarra, H.

AU - Miller, D.

AU - Singerman, L.

AU - Smith-Brewer, S.

AU - Novak, M.

AU - Quin, J.

AU - Palmert, M.

AU - Brown, E.

AU - McConnell, J.

AU - Pugsley, P.

AU - Crawford, P.

AU - Dahms, W.

AU - Brillon, D.

AU - Lackaye, M. E.

AU - Kiss, S.

AU - Chan, R.

AU - Orlin, A.

AU - Rubin, M.

AU - Reppucci, V.

AU - Lee, T.

AU - Chaum, Edward

AU - Patterson, Anthony

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N2 - Purpose We examined the relationship between glycemic control and urinary tract infections in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Women enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study, the observational followup of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, were surveyed to assess the rate of physician diagnosed urinary tract infections in the preceding 12 months. The relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and number of urinary tract infections in the previous 12 months was assessed using a multivariable Poisson regression model. Results A total of 572 women were evaluated at year 17. Mean age was 50.7 ± 7.2 years, mean body mass index was 28.6 ± 5.9 kg/m2, mean type 1 diabetes duration was 29.8 ± 5.0 years and mean glycated hemoglobin was 8.0% ± 0.9%. Of these women 86 (15.0%) reported at least 1 physician diagnosed urinary tract infection during the last 12 months. Higher glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly associated with number of urinary tract infections such that for every unit increase (1%) in recent glycated hemoglobin level, there was a 21% (p=0.02) increase in urinary tract infection frequency in the previous 12 months after adjusting for race, hysterectomy status, urinary incontinence, sexual activity in the last 12 months, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, and nephropathy. Conclusions The frequency of urinary tract infections increases with poor glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes. This relationship is independent of other well described predictors of urinary tract infections and suggests that factors directly related to glycemic control may influence the risk of lower urinary tract infections.

AB - Purpose We examined the relationship between glycemic control and urinary tract infections in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Women enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study, the observational followup of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, were surveyed to assess the rate of physician diagnosed urinary tract infections in the preceding 12 months. The relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and number of urinary tract infections in the previous 12 months was assessed using a multivariable Poisson regression model. Results A total of 572 women were evaluated at year 17. Mean age was 50.7 ± 7.2 years, mean body mass index was 28.6 ± 5.9 kg/m2, mean type 1 diabetes duration was 29.8 ± 5.0 years and mean glycated hemoglobin was 8.0% ± 0.9%. Of these women 86 (15.0%) reported at least 1 physician diagnosed urinary tract infection during the last 12 months. Higher glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly associated with number of urinary tract infections such that for every unit increase (1%) in recent glycated hemoglobin level, there was a 21% (p=0.02) increase in urinary tract infection frequency in the previous 12 months after adjusting for race, hysterectomy status, urinary incontinence, sexual activity in the last 12 months, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, and nephropathy. Conclusions The frequency of urinary tract infections increases with poor glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes. This relationship is independent of other well described predictors of urinary tract infections and suggests that factors directly related to glycemic control may influence the risk of lower urinary tract infections.

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