GM1 ganglioside treatment protects against long-term neurotoxic effects of neonatal X-irradiation on cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture and motor function

Laura Ruth Guelman, María Aurelia Zorrilla Zubilete, Hugo Ríos, Alejandro Dopico, Luis María Zieher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exposure of neonatal rats to a 5 Gy dose of X-irradiation induces permanent abnormalities in cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture (disarrangement of Purkinje cells, reduction of thickness of granular cortex) and neurochemistry (late increase in noradrenaline levels), and motor function (ataxic gait). The neuroprotective effects of gangliosides have been demonstrated using a variety of CNS injuries, including mechanical, electrolytic, neurotoxic, ischemic, and surgical lesions. Here, we evaluated whether systemically administered GM1 ganglioside protects against the long-term CNS abnormalities induced by a single exposure to ionizing radiation in the early post-natal period. Thus, neonatal rats were exposed to 5 Gy X-irradiation, and subcutaneously injected with one dose (30 mg/kg weight) of GM1 on h after exposure followed by three daily doses. Both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait and cerebellar cytoarchitecture in X-irradiated rats were significantly impaired when compared to age-matched controls. By contrast, both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait in X-irradiated rats that were treated with GM1 was not significantly different from that in non-irradiated animals. Furthermore, at post-natal day 90, cerebellar cytoarchitecture was still well preserved in GM1-treated, X-irradiated animals. GM1 failed to modify the radiation-induced increase in cerebellar noradrenaline levels. Present data indicate that exogenous GM1, repeatedly administered after neonatal X-irradiation, produces a long-term radioprotection, demonstrated at both cytoarchitectural and motor levels. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-311
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Research
Volume858
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

G(M1) Ganglioside
Cerebellar Cortex
Gait
Norepinephrine
Gait Ataxia
Neurochemistry
Gangliosides
Purkinje Cells
Neuroprotective Agents
Ionizing Radiation
Radiation
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

GM1 ganglioside treatment protects against long-term neurotoxic effects of neonatal X-irradiation on cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture and motor function. / Guelman, Laura Ruth; Zubilete, María Aurelia Zorrilla; Ríos, Hugo; Dopico, Alejandro; Zieher, Luis María.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 858, No. 2, 10.03.2000, p. 303-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guelman, Laura Ruth ; Zubilete, María Aurelia Zorrilla ; Ríos, Hugo ; Dopico, Alejandro ; Zieher, Luis María. / GM1 ganglioside treatment protects against long-term neurotoxic effects of neonatal X-irradiation on cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture and motor function. In: Brain Research. 2000 ; Vol. 858, No. 2. pp. 303-311.
@article{4e626e7bff0340e4b2c989c90dc89d78,
title = "GM1 ganglioside treatment protects against long-term neurotoxic effects of neonatal X-irradiation on cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture and motor function",
abstract = "Exposure of neonatal rats to a 5 Gy dose of X-irradiation induces permanent abnormalities in cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture (disarrangement of Purkinje cells, reduction of thickness of granular cortex) and neurochemistry (late increase in noradrenaline levels), and motor function (ataxic gait). The neuroprotective effects of gangliosides have been demonstrated using a variety of CNS injuries, including mechanical, electrolytic, neurotoxic, ischemic, and surgical lesions. Here, we evaluated whether systemically administered GM1 ganglioside protects against the long-term CNS abnormalities induced by a single exposure to ionizing radiation in the early post-natal period. Thus, neonatal rats were exposed to 5 Gy X-irradiation, and subcutaneously injected with one dose (30 mg/kg weight) of GM1 on h after exposure followed by three daily doses. Both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait and cerebellar cytoarchitecture in X-irradiated rats were significantly impaired when compared to age-matched controls. By contrast, both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait in X-irradiated rats that were treated with GM1 was not significantly different from that in non-irradiated animals. Furthermore, at post-natal day 90, cerebellar cytoarchitecture was still well preserved in GM1-treated, X-irradiated animals. GM1 failed to modify the radiation-induced increase in cerebellar noradrenaline levels. Present data indicate that exogenous GM1, repeatedly administered after neonatal X-irradiation, produces a long-term radioprotection, demonstrated at both cytoarchitectural and motor levels. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.",
author = "Guelman, {Laura Ruth} and Zubilete, {Mar{\'i}a Aurelia Zorrilla} and Hugo R{\'i}os and Alejandro Dopico and Zieher, {Luis Mar{\'i}a}",
year = "2000",
month = "3",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1016/S0006-8993(99)02444-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "858",
pages = "303--311",
journal = "Brain Research",
issn = "0006-8993",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - GM1 ganglioside treatment protects against long-term neurotoxic effects of neonatal X-irradiation on cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture and motor function

AU - Guelman, Laura Ruth

AU - Zubilete, María Aurelia Zorrilla

AU - Ríos, Hugo

AU - Dopico, Alejandro

AU - Zieher, Luis María

PY - 2000/3/10

Y1 - 2000/3/10

N2 - Exposure of neonatal rats to a 5 Gy dose of X-irradiation induces permanent abnormalities in cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture (disarrangement of Purkinje cells, reduction of thickness of granular cortex) and neurochemistry (late increase in noradrenaline levels), and motor function (ataxic gait). The neuroprotective effects of gangliosides have been demonstrated using a variety of CNS injuries, including mechanical, electrolytic, neurotoxic, ischemic, and surgical lesions. Here, we evaluated whether systemically administered GM1 ganglioside protects against the long-term CNS abnormalities induced by a single exposure to ionizing radiation in the early post-natal period. Thus, neonatal rats were exposed to 5 Gy X-irradiation, and subcutaneously injected with one dose (30 mg/kg weight) of GM1 on h after exposure followed by three daily doses. Both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait and cerebellar cytoarchitecture in X-irradiated rats were significantly impaired when compared to age-matched controls. By contrast, both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait in X-irradiated rats that were treated with GM1 was not significantly different from that in non-irradiated animals. Furthermore, at post-natal day 90, cerebellar cytoarchitecture was still well preserved in GM1-treated, X-irradiated animals. GM1 failed to modify the radiation-induced increase in cerebellar noradrenaline levels. Present data indicate that exogenous GM1, repeatedly administered after neonatal X-irradiation, produces a long-term radioprotection, demonstrated at both cytoarchitectural and motor levels. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

AB - Exposure of neonatal rats to a 5 Gy dose of X-irradiation induces permanent abnormalities in cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture (disarrangement of Purkinje cells, reduction of thickness of granular cortex) and neurochemistry (late increase in noradrenaline levels), and motor function (ataxic gait). The neuroprotective effects of gangliosides have been demonstrated using a variety of CNS injuries, including mechanical, electrolytic, neurotoxic, ischemic, and surgical lesions. Here, we evaluated whether systemically administered GM1 ganglioside protects against the long-term CNS abnormalities induced by a single exposure to ionizing radiation in the early post-natal period. Thus, neonatal rats were exposed to 5 Gy X-irradiation, and subcutaneously injected with one dose (30 mg/kg weight) of GM1 on h after exposure followed by three daily doses. Both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait and cerebellar cytoarchitecture in X-irradiated rats were significantly impaired when compared to age-matched controls. By contrast, both at post-natal days 30 and 90, gait in X-irradiated rats that were treated with GM1 was not significantly different from that in non-irradiated animals. Furthermore, at post-natal day 90, cerebellar cytoarchitecture was still well preserved in GM1-treated, X-irradiated animals. GM1 failed to modify the radiation-induced increase in cerebellar noradrenaline levels. Present data indicate that exogenous GM1, repeatedly administered after neonatal X-irradiation, produces a long-term radioprotection, demonstrated at both cytoarchitectural and motor levels. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034628989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034628989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0006-8993(99)02444-0

DO - 10.1016/S0006-8993(99)02444-0

M3 - Article

VL - 858

SP - 303

EP - 311

JO - Brain Research

JF - Brain Research

SN - 0006-8993

IS - 2

ER -