Group B streptococci exposed to rifampin or clindamycin (versus ampicillin or cefotaxime) stimulate reduced production of inflammatory mediators by murine macrophages

Kevin C. Brinkmann, Ajay Talati, Raumina E. Akbari, Elizabeth A. Meals, B. Keith English

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an important cause of sepsis and meningitis in neonates, and excessive production of the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO) causes tissue injury during severe infections. We hypothesized that exposure of GBS to different antimicrobial agents would affect the magnitude of the macrophage inflammatory response to this organism. We stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages with a type-Ia GBS isolate in the presence of ampicillin, cefotaxime, rifampin, clindamycin, or gentamicin, singly or in combination. We found that GBS exposed to rifampin or clindamycin (versus beta-lactam antibiotics) stimulated less TNF secretion and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein accumulation in RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, GBS exposed to combinations of antibiotics that included a protein synthesis inhibitor stimulated less macrophage TNF and iNOS production than did organisms exposed to beta-lactam antibiotics singly or in combination. We conclude that exposure of GBS to rifampin or clindamycin leads to a less pronounced macrophage inflammatory mediator response than does exposure of the organism to cell wall-active antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-423
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Research
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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Streptococcus agalactiae
Cefotaxime
Clindamycin
Ampicillin
Rifampin
Macrophages
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
beta-Lactams
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Protein Synthesis Inhibitors
Anti-Infective Agents
Gentamicins
Streptococcus
Meningitis
Cell Wall
Sepsis
Nitric Oxide
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Group B streptococci exposed to rifampin or clindamycin (versus ampicillin or cefotaxime) stimulate reduced production of inflammatory mediators by murine macrophages. / Brinkmann, Kevin C.; Talati, Ajay; Akbari, Raumina E.; Meals, Elizabeth A.; English, B. Keith.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 57, No. 3, 01.03.2005, p. 419-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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