Guidance for methods descriptions used in preclinical imaging papers

David Stout, Stuart S. Berr, Amy LeBlanc, Joseph D. Kalen, Dustin Osborne, Julie Price, Wynne Schiffer, Claudia Kuntner, Jonathan Wall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Preclinical molecular imaging is a rapidly growing field, where new imaging systems, methods, and biological findings are constantly being developed or discovered. Imaging systems and the associated software usually have multiple options for generating data, which is often overlooked but is essential when reporting the methods used to create and analyze data. Similarly, the ways in which animals are housed, handled, and treated to create physiologically based data must be well described in order that the findings be relevant, useful, and reproducible. There are frequently new developments for metabolic imaging methods. Thus, specific reporting requirements are difficult to establish; however, it remains essential to adequately report how the data have been collected, processed, and analyzed. To assist with future manuscript submissions, this article aims to provide guidelines of what details to report for several of the most common imaging modalities. Examples are provided in an attempt to give comprehensive, succinct descriptions of the essential items to report about the experimental process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalMolecular Imaging
Volume12
Issue number7
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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Imaging systems
animals
computer programs
Molecular imaging
Imaging techniques
requirements
Animals
Molecular Imaging
Manuscripts
Software
Guidelines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stout, D., Berr, S. S., LeBlanc, A., Kalen, J. D., Osborne, D., Price, J., ... Wall, J. (2013). Guidance for methods descriptions used in preclinical imaging papers. Molecular Imaging, 12(7), 1-15.

Guidance for methods descriptions used in preclinical imaging papers. / Stout, David; Berr, Stuart S.; LeBlanc, Amy; Kalen, Joseph D.; Osborne, Dustin; Price, Julie; Schiffer, Wynne; Kuntner, Claudia; Wall, Jonathan.

In: Molecular Imaging, Vol. 12, No. 7, 01.10.2013, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stout, D, Berr, SS, LeBlanc, A, Kalen, JD, Osborne, D, Price, J, Schiffer, W, Kuntner, C & Wall, J 2013, 'Guidance for methods descriptions used in preclinical imaging papers', Molecular Imaging, vol. 12, no. 7, pp. 1-15.
Stout D, Berr SS, LeBlanc A, Kalen JD, Osborne D, Price J et al. Guidance for methods descriptions used in preclinical imaging papers. Molecular Imaging. 2013 Oct 1;12(7):1-15.
Stout, David ; Berr, Stuart S. ; LeBlanc, Amy ; Kalen, Joseph D. ; Osborne, Dustin ; Price, Julie ; Schiffer, Wynne ; Kuntner, Claudia ; Wall, Jonathan. / Guidance for methods descriptions used in preclinical imaging papers. In: Molecular Imaging. 2013 ; Vol. 12, No. 7. pp. 1-15.
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