Guided outcomes in learned efficiency model in clinical medical education

a randomized controlled trial of self-regulated learning

Avinash S. Patil, Adam C. Elnaggar, Saurabh Kumar, Frank W. Ling, Frank T. Stritter, Loyrirk Temiyakarn, Todd D. Tillmanns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The guided outcomes in learned efficiency (GOLE) model emphasizes the use of evidence-based resources to understand the diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and prevention of disease. We seek to determine whether presentations created using the GOLE model are superior to an unstructured approach in achieving Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies.

STUDY DESIGN: Consenting medical students were randomized to GOLE or control groups to individually research a self-selected clinical topic. A validated survey instrument was used prepresentation and postpresentation to assess perceived improvement in knowledge. Subjects completed self-evaluations at enrollment and after presentation of their chosen clinical topic. Other students, residents, and a faculty member also completed evaluations after each student presentation. Standard statistical methods (analysis of variance, 2-tailed t test) were used to determine if a statistically significant difference existed between intervention and control groups.

RESULTS: Self-assessments were similar in the GOLE and control groups. Externally perceived presentation scores were greater in the GOLE group (ACGME global P < .0001, presentation global P = .07), which demonstrated a significant improvement in 5 core competencies. Time spent preparing the presentation and resources utilized did not differ between groups.

CONCLUSION: The presentations prepared using the GOLE model were rated higher by observers than those prepared using traditional techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume211
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Medical Education
Randomized Controlled Trials
Learning
Efficiency
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Control Groups
Students
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Medical Students
Analysis of Variance
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Guided outcomes in learned efficiency model in clinical medical education : a randomized controlled trial of self-regulated learning. / Patil, Avinash S.; Elnaggar, Adam C.; Kumar, Saurabh; Ling, Frank W.; Stritter, Frank T.; Temiyakarn, Loyrirk; Tillmanns, Todd D.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 211, No. 5, 01.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patil, Avinash S. ; Elnaggar, Adam C. ; Kumar, Saurabh ; Ling, Frank W. ; Stritter, Frank T. ; Temiyakarn, Loyrirk ; Tillmanns, Todd D. / Guided outcomes in learned efficiency model in clinical medical education : a randomized controlled trial of self-regulated learning. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2014 ; Vol. 211, No. 5.
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