Guiding lay navigation in geriatric patients with cancer using a distress assessment tool

Gabrielle B. Rocque, Richard A. Taylor, Aras Acemgil, Xuelin Li, Maria Pisu, Kelly Kenzik, Bradford E. Jackson, Karina I. Halilova, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Karen Meneses, Yufeng Li, Michelle Martin, Carol Chambless, Nedra Lisovicz, Mona Fouad, Edward E. Partridge, Elizabeth A. Kvale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is growing interest in psychosocial care and evaluating distress in patients with cancer. As of 2015, the Commission on Cancer requires cancer centers to screen patients for distress, but the optimal approach to implementation remains unclear. Methods: We assessed the feasibility and impact of using distress assessments to frame lay navigator interactions with geriatric patients with cancer who were enrolled in navigation between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2014. Results: Of the 5,121 patients enrolled in our lay patient navigation program, 4,520 (88%) completed at least one assessment using a standardized distress tool (DT). Navigators used the tool to structure both formal and informal distress assessments. Of all patients, 24% reported distress scores of 4 or greater and 5.5% reported distress scores of 8 or greater. The most common sources of distress at initial assessment were pain, balance/mobility difficulties, and fatigue. Minority patients reported similar sources of distress as the overall program population, with increased relative distress related to logistical issues, such as transportation and financial/insurance questions. Patients were more likely to ask for help with questions about insurance/financial needs (79%), transportation (76%), and knowledge deficits about diet/nutrition (76%) and diagnosis (66%) when these items contributed to distress. Conclusions: Lay navigators were able to routinely screen for patient distress at a high degree of penetration using a structured distress assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-414
Number of pages8
JournalJNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Geriatrics
Neoplasms
Insurance
Patient Navigation
Population Control
Pain Measurement
Fatigue
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

Guiding lay navigation in geriatric patients with cancer using a distress assessment tool. / Rocque, Gabrielle B.; Taylor, Richard A.; Acemgil, Aras; Li, Xuelin; Pisu, Maria; Kenzik, Kelly; Jackson, Bradford E.; Halilova, Karina I.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Meneses, Karen; Li, Yufeng; Martin, Michelle; Chambless, Carol; Lisovicz, Nedra; Fouad, Mona; Partridge, Edward E.; Kvale, Elizabeth A.

In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 407-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rocque, GB, Taylor, RA, Acemgil, A, Li, X, Pisu, M, Kenzik, K, Jackson, BE, Halilova, KI, Demark-Wahnefried, W, Meneses, K, Li, Y, Martin, M, Chambless, C, Lisovicz, N, Fouad, M, Partridge, EE & Kvale, EA 2016, 'Guiding lay navigation in geriatric patients with cancer using a distress assessment tool', JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 407-414. https://doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2016.0047
Rocque, Gabrielle B. ; Taylor, Richard A. ; Acemgil, Aras ; Li, Xuelin ; Pisu, Maria ; Kenzik, Kelly ; Jackson, Bradford E. ; Halilova, Karina I. ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy ; Meneses, Karen ; Li, Yufeng ; Martin, Michelle ; Chambless, Carol ; Lisovicz, Nedra ; Fouad, Mona ; Partridge, Edward E. ; Kvale, Elizabeth A. / Guiding lay navigation in geriatric patients with cancer using a distress assessment tool. In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. 2016 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 407-414.
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AU - Pisu, Maria

AU - Kenzik, Kelly

AU - Jackson, Bradford E.

AU - Halilova, Karina I.

AU - Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

AU - Meneses, Karen

AU - Li, Yufeng

AU - Martin, Michelle

AU - Chambless, Carol

AU - Lisovicz, Nedra

AU - Fouad, Mona

AU - Partridge, Edward E.

AU - Kvale, Elizabeth A.

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