Health and economic impact of the premenstrual syndrome

Jeff E. Borenstein, Bonnie B. Dean, Jean Endicott, John Wong, Candace Brown, Vivian Dickerson, Kimberly A. Yonkers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) on heath-related quality of life, health care utilization and occupational functioning. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional cohort study of women prospectively diagnosed with PMS. RESULTS: Among women completing the survey, 28.7% were diagnosed with PMS. Women with PMS had significantly lower scores on the Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) scale scores of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 as compared to women without PMS (MCS = 42.8 vs. 49.5, P < .001, and PCS = 51.1 vs. 53.0, P = .04). Women with PMS reported reduced work productivity, interference with hobbies and greater number of work days missed for health reasons (P < .001). In addition, women with PMS experienced an increased frequency of ambulatory health care provider visits (P = .04) and were more likely to accrue >$500 in visit costs over 2 years (P < .006). CONCLUSION: Findings from this study suggest that premenstrual symptoms significantly affect health-related quality of life and may result in increased health care utilization and decreased occupational productivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-524
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Volume48
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

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Premenstrual Syndrome
Economics
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Health
Quality of Life
Quality of Health Care
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Borenstein, J. E., Dean, B. B., Endicott, J., Wong, J., Brown, C., Dickerson, V., & Yonkers, K. A. (2003). Health and economic impact of the premenstrual syndrome. Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist, 48(7), 515-524.

Health and economic impact of the premenstrual syndrome. / Borenstein, Jeff E.; Dean, Bonnie B.; Endicott, Jean; Wong, John; Brown, Candace; Dickerson, Vivian; Yonkers, Kimberly A.

In: Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Vol. 48, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 515-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borenstein, JE, Dean, BB, Endicott, J, Wong, J, Brown, C, Dickerson, V & Yonkers, KA 2003, 'Health and economic impact of the premenstrual syndrome', Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist, vol. 48, no. 7, pp. 515-524.
Borenstein JE, Dean BB, Endicott J, Wong J, Brown C, Dickerson V et al. Health and economic impact of the premenstrual syndrome. Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist. 2003 Jul 1;48(7):515-524.
Borenstein, Jeff E. ; Dean, Bonnie B. ; Endicott, Jean ; Wong, John ; Brown, Candace ; Dickerson, Vivian ; Yonkers, Kimberly A. / Health and economic impact of the premenstrual syndrome. In: Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist. 2003 ; Vol. 48, No. 7. pp. 515-524.
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