Health Insurance and Disability Levels for Older Black and White Women in the South

Shelley White-Means, Judith M. Hammond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For this article, the authors used the National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES) to look at health insurance coverage for persons aged 50 and older. Although previous research has shown that race, gender, and region influence health insurance status, little is known about how these factors interact to affect that status. It was found that there is a crucial intersection of gender, race, and region in the reliance on Medicaid and in not having any insurance for persons aged 50 and older. Over 73% of southern Black women are covered by Medicaid, compared to 9.4%, 16.6%, and 33% of southern White men, White women, and Black men, respectively. Having no insurance or insurance coverage through Medicaid, being unmarried, and having low levels of formal education are associated with reports of significantly higher levels of disability among older women. The article concludes with the implications of these findings for national health and family policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-496
Number of pages15
JournalThe Journal of Applied Gerontology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Insurance Coverage
Medicaid
Health Insurance
Insurance
Family Planning Policy
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Status
Education
Research
hydroquinone

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Health Insurance and Disability Levels for Older Black and White Women in the South. / White-Means, Shelley; Hammond, Judith M.

In: The Journal of Applied Gerontology, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.01.1993, p. 482-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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