Health promotion practices among physicians

K. K. Yeager, J. B. Croft, R. S. Donehoo, Gregory Heath, C. A. Macera, M. J. Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Personal belief concerning both the validity of health promotion and the physician's ability to influence patient behavior may affect how much effort a physician spends on health promotion strategies. We assessed these beliefs through a mail survey to physicians practicing in a predominantly rural southern state in 1987 (n = 83) and 1991 (n = 96). Response rates in both studies exceeded 75%. The instrument was obtained from similar studies conducted in Massachusetts in 1981 and Maryland in 1983. Between 1987 and 1991 we found slight improvements in the perceived importance of many health behaviors, but significant improvement was observed in the importance of reducing intake of dietary saturated fat (66% in 1987 to 80% in 1991; P < .05). Less than 10% of the physicians thought they could be 'very successful' in modifying patients' behaviors. However, in 1991 physicians perceived that their ability to be 'very successful' in helping patients to modify their behavior would increase threefold (8%-24% for exercise; 4%-18% for smoking) if given appropriate support. Although the type of appropriate support was not identified, the credibility of physician's advice in promoting health changes is important. These results suggest that efforts should be made to provide support to physicians who are inclined to discuss health behavior changes with their patients. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): dietary fats, exercise, patient education, physician's practice patterns, smoking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)238-241
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume12
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 25 1996

Fingerprint

Health Promotion
Physicians
Aptitude
Dietary Fats
Health Behavior
Smoking
Medical Subject Headings
Physicians' Practice Patterns
Exercise
Postal Service
Patient Education
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Yeager, K. K., Croft, J. B., Donehoo, R. S., Heath, G., Macera, C. A., & Lane, M. J. (1996). Health promotion practices among physicians. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 12(4), 238-241.

Health promotion practices among physicians. / Yeager, K. K.; Croft, J. B.; Donehoo, R. S.; Heath, Gregory; Macera, C. A.; Lane, M. J.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 4, 25.09.1996, p. 238-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yeager, KK, Croft, JB, Donehoo, RS, Heath, G, Macera, CA & Lane, MJ 1996, 'Health promotion practices among physicians', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 238-241.
Yeager KK, Croft JB, Donehoo RS, Heath G, Macera CA, Lane MJ. Health promotion practices among physicians. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 1996 Sep 25;12(4):238-241.
Yeager, K. K. ; Croft, J. B. ; Donehoo, R. S. ; Heath, Gregory ; Macera, C. A. ; Lane, M. J. / Health promotion practices among physicians. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 238-241.
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