Heat Shock RNA Levels in Brain and Other Tissues After Hyperthermia and Transient Ischemia

Thaddeus Nowak, Ursula Bond, Milton J. Schlesinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

171 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number of studies have demonstrated increased synthesis of heat shock proteins in brain following hyperthermia or transient ischemia. In the present experiments we have characterized the time course of heat shock RNA induction in gerbil brain after ischemia, and in several mouse tissues after hyperthermia, using probes for RNAs of the 70‐kilodalton heat shock protein (hsp70) family, as well as ubiquitin. A synthetic oligonucleotide selective for inducible hsp70 sequences proved to be the most sensitive indicator of ± the stress response whereas a related rat cDNA detected both induced RNAs and constitutively expressed sequences that were not strongly inducible in brain. Considerable polymorphism of ubiquitin sequences was evident in the outbred mouse and gerbil strains used in these studies when probed with a chicken ubiquitin cDNA. Brief hyperthermic exposure resulted in striking induction of hsp70 and several‐fold increases in ubiquitin RNAs in mouse liver and kidney peaking 3 h after return to room temperature. The oligonucleotide selective for hsp70 showed equivalent induction in brain that was more rapid and transient than observed in liver, whereas minimal induction was seen with the ubiquitin and hsp70‐related cDNA probes. Transient ischemia resulted in 5‐ to 10‐fold increases in hsp70 sequences in gerbil brain which peaked at 6 h recirculation and remained above control levels at 24 h, whereas a modest 70% increase in ubiquitin sequences was noted at 6 h. These results demonstrate significant temporal and quantitative differences in heat shock RNA expression between brain and other tissues following hyperthermia in vivo, and indicate that hsp70 provides a more sensitive index of the stress response in brain than does ubiquitin after both hyperthermia and ischemia. These studies emphasize the importance of using probes selective for stress‐inducible hsp70 sequences in evaluation of the heat shock response, particularly in tissues such as brain in which there is significant constitutive expression of hsp70‐related proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-458
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ubiquitin
Shock
Brain
Fever
Ischemia
Hot Temperature
RNA
Tissue
Gerbillinae
Complementary DNA
Heat-Shock Proteins
Oligonucleotides
Liver
RNA Probes
Heat-Shock Response
Brain Ischemia
Level control
Polymorphism
Chickens
Rats

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Heat Shock RNA Levels in Brain and Other Tissues After Hyperthermia and Transient Ischemia. / Nowak, Thaddeus; Bond, Ursula; Schlesinger, Milton J.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 54, No. 2, 01.01.1990, p. 451-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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