Hematologic changes with aging

Peter Fischer, Thomas G. Deloughery, Martin A. Schreiber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The age-related hematologic changes of older trauma victims include a baseline anemia and hypercoagulability. These patients have less responsive bone marrow and are slower to repopulate cell lines following injury and hemorrhage. Pre-injury medication profiles for older patients will often include at least one anticoagulant, and understanding of its mechanism and reversal can be lifesaving. The geriatric trauma patient is challenging, and knowledge of both natural and iatrogenic hematologic changes is paramount to their care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeriatric Trauma and Critical Care
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages55-60
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781461485018
ISBN (Print)9781461485001
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Wounds and Injuries
Thrombophilia
Geriatrics
Anticoagulants
Anemia
Bone Marrow
Hemorrhage
Cell Line

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fischer, P., Deloughery, T. G., & Schreiber, M. A. (2014). Hematologic changes with aging. In Geriatric Trauma and Critical Care (pp. 55-60). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8501-8_7

Hematologic changes with aging. / Fischer, Peter; Deloughery, Thomas G.; Schreiber, Martin A.

Geriatric Trauma and Critical Care. Springer New York, 2014. p. 55-60.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Fischer, P, Deloughery, TG & Schreiber, MA 2014, Hematologic changes with aging. in Geriatric Trauma and Critical Care. Springer New York, pp. 55-60. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8501-8_7
Fischer P, Deloughery TG, Schreiber MA. Hematologic changes with aging. In Geriatric Trauma and Critical Care. Springer New York. 2014. p. 55-60 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8501-8_7
Fischer, Peter ; Deloughery, Thomas G. ; Schreiber, Martin A. / Hematologic changes with aging. Geriatric Trauma and Critical Care. Springer New York, 2014. pp. 55-60
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