Hematuria in children

Hiren P. Patel, John Bissler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with hematuria require a thorough history and physical examination. Not all children with hematuria require the same investigations. The only laboratory test uniformly required for children with the various presentations of hematuria is a complete urinalysis with a microscopic examination. The rest of the evaluation is tailored according to the pertinent history, physical examination, and other abnormalities on the urinalysis. This article has provided a brief summary of the more common causes of pediatric hematuria and suggestions for tailoring the patient's evaluation according to the presentation. Most causes of hematuria in pediatrics represent medical conditions that often require referral to a pediatric nephrologist. Indications for referral to a urologist are more limited and include stones that do not pass spontaneously or are more than 5 mm in diameter, renal injury from trauma, anatomic abnormalities, or gross hematuria that seems to originate from the urinary tract and is without an identified cause.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1519-1537
Number of pages19
JournalPediatric Clinics of North America
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Hematuria
Urinalysis
Pediatrics
Physical Examination
Referral and Consultation
History
Wounds and Injuries
Urinary Tract
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Hematuria in children. / Patel, Hiren P.; Bissler, John.

In: Pediatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 48, No. 6, 01.01.2001, p. 1519-1537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, Hiren P. ; Bissler, John. / Hematuria in children. In: Pediatric Clinics of North America. 2001 ; Vol. 48, No. 6. pp. 1519-1537.
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