Hemispheric language dominance in magnetoencephalography

Sensitivity, specificity, and data reduction techniques

Warren S. Merrifield, Panagiotis G. Simos, Andrew Papanicolaou, Linda M. Philpott, William W. Sutherling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the areas involved in language functions not only enables investigators to understand neuroanatomical structures, but may be a promising technique in the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. The predictive power of various data reduction techniques was tested on language data obtained by magnetoencephalography (MEG) of 16 patients and 12 control subjects. Words were presented aurally in two phases: the study phase and the recognition phase. Subjects were asked to remember words from the study phase and indicate if they remembered those words during the recognition phase. Single equivalent-current dipoles were calculated to determine laterality indices and the neuroanatomical correlates of language function. For all patients, results indicated a concordance, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.75. After consideration of IQ scores and exclusion from the analysis of those patients with scores below the average range, the results indicated a concordance of 0.90, sensitivity of 0.86, and specificity of 1.00. These findings are consistent with previous MEG investigations of language function in comparison with the Wada technique and support the use of MEG language mapping in most patients with an IQ within or above the average range.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-128
Number of pages9
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

Fingerprint

Magnetoencephalography
Language
Sensitivity and Specificity
Epilepsy
Research Personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Hemispheric language dominance in magnetoencephalography : Sensitivity, specificity, and data reduction techniques. / Merrifield, Warren S.; Simos, Panagiotis G.; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Philpott, Linda M.; Sutherling, William W.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.02.2007, p. 120-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Merrifield, Warren S. ; Simos, Panagiotis G. ; Papanicolaou, Andrew ; Philpott, Linda M. ; Sutherling, William W. / Hemispheric language dominance in magnetoencephalography : Sensitivity, specificity, and data reduction techniques. In: Epilepsy and Behavior. 2007 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 120-128.
@article{d3bd1a96ac32417b818bce5ed948c0d6,
title = "Hemispheric language dominance in magnetoencephalography: Sensitivity, specificity, and data reduction techniques",
abstract = "Understanding the areas involved in language functions not only enables investigators to understand neuroanatomical structures, but may be a promising technique in the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. The predictive power of various data reduction techniques was tested on language data obtained by magnetoencephalography (MEG) of 16 patients and 12 control subjects. Words were presented aurally in two phases: the study phase and the recognition phase. Subjects were asked to remember words from the study phase and indicate if they remembered those words during the recognition phase. Single equivalent-current dipoles were calculated to determine laterality indices and the neuroanatomical correlates of language function. For all patients, results indicated a concordance, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.75. After consideration of IQ scores and exclusion from the analysis of those patients with scores below the average range, the results indicated a concordance of 0.90, sensitivity of 0.86, and specificity of 1.00. These findings are consistent with previous MEG investigations of language function in comparison with the Wada technique and support the use of MEG language mapping in most patients with an IQ within or above the average range.",
author = "Merrifield, {Warren S.} and Simos, {Panagiotis G.} and Andrew Papanicolaou and Philpott, {Linda M.} and Sutherling, {William W.}",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.yebeh.2006.10.012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "120--128",
journal = "Epilepsy and Behavior",
issn = "1525-5050",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hemispheric language dominance in magnetoencephalography

T2 - Sensitivity, specificity, and data reduction techniques

AU - Merrifield, Warren S.

AU - Simos, Panagiotis G.

AU - Papanicolaou, Andrew

AU - Philpott, Linda M.

AU - Sutherling, William W.

PY - 2007/2/1

Y1 - 2007/2/1

N2 - Understanding the areas involved in language functions not only enables investigators to understand neuroanatomical structures, but may be a promising technique in the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. The predictive power of various data reduction techniques was tested on language data obtained by magnetoencephalography (MEG) of 16 patients and 12 control subjects. Words were presented aurally in two phases: the study phase and the recognition phase. Subjects were asked to remember words from the study phase and indicate if they remembered those words during the recognition phase. Single equivalent-current dipoles were calculated to determine laterality indices and the neuroanatomical correlates of language function. For all patients, results indicated a concordance, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.75. After consideration of IQ scores and exclusion from the analysis of those patients with scores below the average range, the results indicated a concordance of 0.90, sensitivity of 0.86, and specificity of 1.00. These findings are consistent with previous MEG investigations of language function in comparison with the Wada technique and support the use of MEG language mapping in most patients with an IQ within or above the average range.

AB - Understanding the areas involved in language functions not only enables investigators to understand neuroanatomical structures, but may be a promising technique in the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. The predictive power of various data reduction techniques was tested on language data obtained by magnetoencephalography (MEG) of 16 patients and 12 control subjects. Words were presented aurally in two phases: the study phase and the recognition phase. Subjects were asked to remember words from the study phase and indicate if they remembered those words during the recognition phase. Single equivalent-current dipoles were calculated to determine laterality indices and the neuroanatomical correlates of language function. For all patients, results indicated a concordance, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.75. After consideration of IQ scores and exclusion from the analysis of those patients with scores below the average range, the results indicated a concordance of 0.90, sensitivity of 0.86, and specificity of 1.00. These findings are consistent with previous MEG investigations of language function in comparison with the Wada technique and support the use of MEG language mapping in most patients with an IQ within or above the average range.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846340792&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846340792&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2006.10.012

DO - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2006.10.012

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 120

EP - 128

JO - Epilepsy and Behavior

JF - Epilepsy and Behavior

SN - 1525-5050

IS - 1

ER -