Hemodynamic changes during aging associated with cerebral blood flow and impaired cognitive function

R. S. Ajmani, E. Metter, R. Jaykumar, D. K. Ingram, E. L. Spangler, O. O. Abugo, J. M. Rifkind

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Abstract

This study investigates the age associated changes in hemorheological properties and cerebral blood flow. Partial correlations indicate that part of the age-dependent decrease in flow velocities can be attributed to a hemorheological decrement resulting in part from enhanced oxidative stress in the aged. A possible link with Alzheimer's pathology is suggested by the augmented hemorheological impairment resulting from in vitro incubation of red cells with amyloids. These results suggest that in aging, oxidative stress as well as amyloids may influence the fluid properties of blood, resulting in a potential decrement in blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain. Animal intervention studies further demonstrate that altered hemorheological properties of blood can actually influence cognitive function. The relationships shown to exist between hemorheology, blood flow, amyloids, oxidative stress, and cognitive function suggest that these factors may be one of the mechanisms operating in the complex etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-269
Number of pages13
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Cognition
Hemodynamics
Amyloid
Oxidative Stress
Hemorheology
Alzheimer Disease
Pathology
Oxygen
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Ajmani, R. S., Metter, E., Jaykumar, R., Ingram, D. K., Spangler, E. L., Abugo, O. O., & Rifkind, J. M. (2000). Hemodynamic changes during aging associated with cerebral blood flow and impaired cognitive function. Neurobiology of Aging, 21(2), 257-269. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0197-4580(00)00118-4

Hemodynamic changes during aging associated with cerebral blood flow and impaired cognitive function. / Ajmani, R. S.; Metter, E.; Jaykumar, R.; Ingram, D. K.; Spangler, E. L.; Abugo, O. O.; Rifkind, J. M.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.03.2000, p. 257-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ajmani, R. S. ; Metter, E. ; Jaykumar, R. ; Ingram, D. K. ; Spangler, E. L. ; Abugo, O. O. ; Rifkind, J. M. / Hemodynamic changes during aging associated with cerebral blood flow and impaired cognitive function. In: Neurobiology of Aging. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 257-269.
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