Hemodynamic response to intentionally altered flow continuity of dobutamine and dopamine by an infusion pump in infants

Cindy D. Stowe, Stephanie A. Storgion, Kelley Lee, Stephanie Phelps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective. To evaluate the effect of an intentional alteration in infusion pump flow continuity on the hemodynamic stability of infants receiving either dobutamine or dopamine. Design. Prospective, open-label study. Setting. A university-affiliated children's hospital. Patients. Ten hemodynamically stable infants (age 2 wks-10 mo) in intensive care receiving dobutamine (5) or dopamine (5). Three patients received both agents and were studied at independent times. Interventions. Dobutamine and dopamine were administered using the Flo-Gard VP pump that delivers an intentional alteration of flow continuity (rate pulse). Heart rate and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded every second. Analysis was based on the measurements obtained from the first 5 minutes on the study pump and the 2 minutes before and after the rate pulse. Measurements and Main Results. Although hemodynamic changes in pre and post-rate pulses were statistically significant (p<0.05) in some individuals, only one infant had a greater that 10% change in MAP 2 minutes after the rate pulse. Alterations in hemodynamics were not consistent among or within patients. Conclusion. In infants requiring dobutamine or dopamine, no clinically significant pharmacodynamic effects were associated with alteration in continuity of drug delivery caused by the single positive rate pulse. Therefore, we conclude there is no contraindication to the use of this infusion pump in hemodynamically stable infants receiving these drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1018-1023
Number of pages6
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume16
Issue number6 I
StatePublished - Nov 1 1996

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Infusion Pumps
Dobutamine
Dopamine
Heart Rate
Hemodynamics
Arterial Pressure
Critical Care
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Hemodynamic response to intentionally altered flow continuity of dobutamine and dopamine by an infusion pump in infants. / Stowe, Cindy D.; Storgion, Stephanie A.; Lee, Kelley; Phelps, Stephanie.

In: Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 16, No. 6 I, 01.11.1996, p. 1018-1023.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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