Hemodynamic response to vasopressin during V1-receptor antagonism in baroreflex-deficient subjects

Kim Huch, K. R. Runyan, Barry Wall, H. Gavras, C. R. Cooke

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Abstract

Six quadriplegic subjects and 6 control subjects received high-dose arginine vasopressin (AVP) infusions at rates of 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 μU · kg-1 · min-1 in consecutive 10-min intervals. Six additional quadriplegic subjects received low-dose AVP infusions at rates of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 μU · kg-1 · min-1. All subjects were studied once with and once without administration of a selective V1-receptor antagonist. During high-dose AVP infusions without V1-receptor blockade, mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased from 80 ± 4 to 87 ± 5 mmHg (P < 0.05) in quadriplegic subjects but was unchanged in control subjects. In the presence of V1-receptor blockade, MAP decreased from 75 ± 4 to 58 ± 4 mmHg (P < 0.001), and heart rate (HR) increased from 61 ± 5 to 80 ± 5 beats/min (P < 0.001) in quadriplegic subjects. In the studies on control subjects, MAP decreased only from 75 ± 3 to 72 ± 5 mmHg (P < 0.05), whereas HR increased from 64 ± 4 to 87 ± 4 beats/min (P < 0.001). Plasma renin activity (PRA) increased in both quadriplegic and control subjects. The effects of low-dose AVP infusions on MAP, HR, and PRA in quadriplegic subjects were similar to those observed during high-dose infusions. Thus, in the absence of baroreceptor-mediated sympathetic nervous system responses, a vasodilatory effect of AVP that is capable of producing marked reductions in MAP can be demonstrated in the presence of V1-receptor blockade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume268
Issue number1 37-1
StatePublished - Feb 13 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Vasopressin Receptors
Baroreflex
Arginine Vasopressin
Vasopressins
Arterial Pressure
Hemodynamics
Heart Rate
Renin
Pressoreceptors
Sympathetic Nervous System

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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Hemodynamic response to vasopressin during V1-receptor antagonism in baroreflex-deficient subjects. / Huch, Kim; Runyan, K. R.; Wall, Barry; Gavras, H.; Cooke, C. R.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 268, No. 1 37-1, 13.02.1995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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