Hemodynamic response to vasopressin in dehydrated human subjects.

Kim Huch, Barry Wall, T. A. Mangold, M. A. Bobal, C. R. Cooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite the known potent vasoconstrictor effects of vasopressin, the role of this hormone in the maintenance of blood pressure is incompletely understood. In studies performed in animals with increased plasma vasopressin concentrations, several complex cardiovascular effects have been noted, including decreases in heart rate and cardiac output, which may account for a lack of effect on arterial pressure despite the vasopressin-induced increase in total peripheral resistance. Only a few studies have been done to assess the cardiovascular effects of vasopressin in human subjects, and most of these have been limited to measurement of heart rate and arterial pressure only. The present study was designed to identify more fully the cardiovascular effects of vasopressin when plasma vasopressin concentrations are increased by osmotic stimulation without the superimposition of major nonosmotic stimuli associated with severe volume depletion. METHOD: Studies were performed on 11 normal human subjects in supine and erect posture before and after 24 hours of fluid deprivation, and following administration of a selective V1 receptor antagonist, [d(CH2)5Tyr(ME)]AVP, after dehydration. Cardiovascular parameters were measured noninvasively by thoracic electrical bioimpedance cardiography and blood samples for measurements of plasma concentrations of vasopressin and other hormones affected by dehydration and differences in posture were collected for subsequent analysis. RESULTS: After 24 hours of fluid restriction, plasma osmolality was increased from 287 +/- 0.9 to 294 +/- 0.7 mosm/kg H20 and plasma vasopressin concentrations (Pavp) were increased in both supine and erect posture. Mean arterial (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were reduced by fluid restriction but were higher in erect than in supine posture both before and after fluid restriction. Heart rate (HR), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and systemic vascular resistance (SVRI) were also higher in erect than in supine posture, while cardiac index (CI), stroke index (SI), end-diastolic index (EDI), and an index of total thoracic fluid content (TFC) were all reduced in erect posture, both before and after dehydration. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (Pne) were increased in erect posture, both before and after dehydration, but there was no effect of erect posture on plasma vasopressin concentrations (Pavp), either before or after dehydration. Administration of the V1 receptor antagonist after dehydration had no effect on hemodynamic parameters other than small reductions in DBP and cardiac preload. CONCLUSION: It is concluded from these studies that small increases in Pavp associated with moderate dehydration do not play a role in the maintenance of arterial pressure in normal human subjects in either supine or erect posture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-318
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of investigative medicine : the official publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research
Volume46
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Hemodynamics
Vasopressins
Posture
Dehydration
Plasmas
Blood Pressure
Blood pressure
Fluids
Vasopressin Receptors
Arterial Pressure
Heart Rate
Vascular Resistance
Thorax
Cardiography
Maintenance
Hormones
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Renin
Cardiac Output
Osmolar Concentration

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Hemodynamic response to vasopressin in dehydrated human subjects. / Huch, Kim; Wall, Barry; Mangold, T. A.; Bobal, M. A.; Cooke, C. R.

In: Journal of investigative medicine : the official publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research, Vol. 46, No. 6, 01.01.1998, p. 312-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Despite the known potent vasoconstrictor effects of vasopressin, the role of this hormone in the maintenance of blood pressure is incompletely understood. In studies performed in animals with increased plasma vasopressin concentrations, several complex cardiovascular effects have been noted, including decreases in heart rate and cardiac output, which may account for a lack of effect on arterial pressure despite the vasopressin-induced increase in total peripheral resistance. Only a few studies have been done to assess the cardiovascular effects of vasopressin in human subjects, and most of these have been limited to measurement of heart rate and arterial pressure only. The present study was designed to identify more fully the cardiovascular effects of vasopressin when plasma vasopressin concentrations are increased by osmotic stimulation without the superimposition of major nonosmotic stimuli associated with severe volume depletion. METHOD: Studies were performed on 11 normal human subjects in supine and erect posture before and after 24 hours of fluid deprivation, and following administration of a selective V1 receptor antagonist, [d(CH2)5Tyr(ME)]AVP, after dehydration. Cardiovascular parameters were measured noninvasively by thoracic electrical bioimpedance cardiography and blood samples for measurements of plasma concentrations of vasopressin and other hormones affected by dehydration and differences in posture were collected for subsequent analysis. RESULTS: After 24 hours of fluid restriction, plasma osmolality was increased from 287 +/- 0.9 to 294 +/- 0.7 mosm/kg H20 and plasma vasopressin concentrations (Pavp) were increased in both supine and erect posture. Mean arterial (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were reduced by fluid restriction but were higher in erect than in supine posture both before and after fluid restriction. Heart rate (HR), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and systemic vascular resistance (SVRI) were also higher in erect than in supine posture, while cardiac index (CI), stroke index (SI), end-diastolic index (EDI), and an index of total thoracic fluid content (TFC) were all reduced in erect posture, both before and after dehydration. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (Pne) were increased in erect posture, both before and after dehydration, but there was no effect of erect posture on plasma vasopressin concentrations (Pavp), either before or after dehydration. Administration of the V1 receptor antagonist after dehydration had no effect on hemodynamic parameters other than small reductions in DBP and cardiac preload. CONCLUSION: It is concluded from these studies that small increases in Pavp associated with moderate dehydration do not play a role in the maintenance of arterial pressure in normal human subjects in either supine or erect posture.",
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T1 - Hemodynamic response to vasopressin in dehydrated human subjects.

AU - Huch, Kim

AU - Wall, Barry

AU - Mangold, T. A.

AU - Bobal, M. A.

AU - Cooke, C. R.

PY - 1998/1/1

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite the known potent vasoconstrictor effects of vasopressin, the role of this hormone in the maintenance of blood pressure is incompletely understood. In studies performed in animals with increased plasma vasopressin concentrations, several complex cardiovascular effects have been noted, including decreases in heart rate and cardiac output, which may account for a lack of effect on arterial pressure despite the vasopressin-induced increase in total peripheral resistance. Only a few studies have been done to assess the cardiovascular effects of vasopressin in human subjects, and most of these have been limited to measurement of heart rate and arterial pressure only. The present study was designed to identify more fully the cardiovascular effects of vasopressin when plasma vasopressin concentrations are increased by osmotic stimulation without the superimposition of major nonosmotic stimuli associated with severe volume depletion. METHOD: Studies were performed on 11 normal human subjects in supine and erect posture before and after 24 hours of fluid deprivation, and following administration of a selective V1 receptor antagonist, [d(CH2)5Tyr(ME)]AVP, after dehydration. Cardiovascular parameters were measured noninvasively by thoracic electrical bioimpedance cardiography and blood samples for measurements of plasma concentrations of vasopressin and other hormones affected by dehydration and differences in posture were collected for subsequent analysis. RESULTS: After 24 hours of fluid restriction, plasma osmolality was increased from 287 +/- 0.9 to 294 +/- 0.7 mosm/kg H20 and plasma vasopressin concentrations (Pavp) were increased in both supine and erect posture. Mean arterial (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were reduced by fluid restriction but were higher in erect than in supine posture both before and after fluid restriction. Heart rate (HR), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and systemic vascular resistance (SVRI) were also higher in erect than in supine posture, while cardiac index (CI), stroke index (SI), end-diastolic index (EDI), and an index of total thoracic fluid content (TFC) were all reduced in erect posture, both before and after dehydration. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (Pne) were increased in erect posture, both before and after dehydration, but there was no effect of erect posture on plasma vasopressin concentrations (Pavp), either before or after dehydration. Administration of the V1 receptor antagonist after dehydration had no effect on hemodynamic parameters other than small reductions in DBP and cardiac preload. CONCLUSION: It is concluded from these studies that small increases in Pavp associated with moderate dehydration do not play a role in the maintenance of arterial pressure in normal human subjects in either supine or erect posture.

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