Hemodynamic, ventilatory and metabolic effects of light isometric exercise in patients with chronic heart failure

Hanumanth K. Reddy, Karl Weber, Joseph S. Janicki, Patricia A. McElroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Light isometric exercise, such as lifting or carrying loads that require 25% of a maximal voluntary contraction, is frequently reported to cause dyspnea in patients with heart failure. The pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the appearance of this symptom, however, are unknown. Accordingly, hemodynamic, metabolic and ventilatory responses to 6 min of light isometric forearm exercise were examined and compared in 20 patients with chronic heart failure and abnormal ejection fraction (24 ± 9%) and 17 normal individuals. In contrast to findings in normal volunteers, exercise cardiac index did not increase whereas exercising forearm and mixed venous lactate concentrations increased (p < 0.05) above levels at rest in patients with heart failure; at 90 s of recovery, blood lactate concentration remained elevated (p < 0.05). The venous lactate concentration of the nonexercising arm, unlike that of the exercising forearm, was not altered. Oxygen uptake, carbon droxide production and minute ventilation increased similarly in patients and nomal subjects durings exercise, but only in patients did each increase further (p < 0.05) during recovery. Thus, in patients with heart failure, light iaometric forearm exercise represents an anaerobic contraction with lactate production. The subsequent increase in carbon dioxide production leads to a disproportionate increase in minute ventilation and oxygen uptake during recovery that may be perceived as breathlessness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-358
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Failure
Hemodynamics
Exercise
Light
Forearm
Lactic Acid
Dyspnea
Ventilation
Oxygen
Carbon Dioxide
Healthy Volunteers
Arm
Carbon

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hemodynamic, ventilatory and metabolic effects of light isometric exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. / Reddy, Hanumanth K.; Weber, Karl; Janicki, Joseph S.; McElroy, Patricia A.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.01.1988, p. 353-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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