Hemolytic uremic syndrome

Overview and update

Naglaa Michel Habib Keriakos, Rami Khouzam

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

HUS is defined by the triad of haemolytic anaemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. It became a public health problem following the European outbreak of E. coli (O104:H4) gastroenteritis in 2011 [1]. The disease mainly affects children one to 10 years of age. It begins after an incubation period of 4 to 7 days with abrupt onset of bloody diarrhea and abdominal pain. Two to ten days later, microangiopathy, haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure develop. HUS microangiopathy can involve almost any organ, but damage to kidneys and central nervous system cause the most severe clinical problems [2]. HUS is classified into three primary types: (1) HUS due to infections, often associated with diarrhea (D+HUS), with the rare exception of HUS due to a severe disseminated infection caused by Streptococcus; (2) HUS related to complement abnormalities, such HUS is also known as 'atypical HUS' and is not diarrhea associated (D-HUS); and (3) HUS of unknown etiology that usually occurs in the course of systemic diseases or physiopathologic conditions such as pregnancy [3]. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) is defined as a triad of micro-angiopathic hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. This term was first used by Gasser et al. in 1955.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHemolytic Uremic Syndrome
Subtitle of host publicationSymptoms, Treatment Options and Prognosis
PublisherFuture Medicine Ltd.
Pages93-107
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781634632461
ISBN (Print)9781634632270
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Disease
etiology
pain
pregnancy
damages
public health
cause

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Keriakos, N. M. H., & Khouzam, R. (2014). Hemolytic uremic syndrome: Overview and update. In Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Symptoms, Treatment Options and Prognosis (pp. 93-107). Future Medicine Ltd..

Hemolytic uremic syndrome : Overview and update. / Keriakos, Naglaa Michel Habib; Khouzam, Rami.

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Symptoms, Treatment Options and Prognosis. Future Medicine Ltd., 2014. p. 93-107.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Keriakos, NMH & Khouzam, R 2014, Hemolytic uremic syndrome: Overview and update. in Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Symptoms, Treatment Options and Prognosis. Future Medicine Ltd., pp. 93-107.
Keriakos NMH, Khouzam R. Hemolytic uremic syndrome: Overview and update. In Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Symptoms, Treatment Options and Prognosis. Future Medicine Ltd. 2014. p. 93-107
Keriakos, Naglaa Michel Habib ; Khouzam, Rami. / Hemolytic uremic syndrome : Overview and update. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Symptoms, Treatment Options and Prognosis. Future Medicine Ltd., 2014. pp. 93-107
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