Hepatic vein reconstruction for resection of hepatic tumors

Alan W. Hemming, Alan I. Reed, Max Langham, Shiro Fujita, Willem J. Van Der Werf, Richard J. Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Summary Background Data: Involvement of the hepatic veins requiring reconstruction has traditionally been considered a contraindication to resection for advanced tumors of the liver because the surgical risks are high and the long-term prognosis poor. Recent advances in liver surgery gleaned from split and live donor liver transplantation that necessitate hepatic vein reconstruction can be applied to hepatic resection in some cases. Methods: Sixteen patients who underwent hepatic resection requiring hepatic vein reconstruction from 1996-2001 were reviewed. The mean age was 43 years (range 2-61). Nine patients were resected for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), five patients for colorectal metastases, and one patient each for hepatoblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma. In six patients with HCC and cirrhosis, the right hepatic vein was reconstructed to provide venous outflow to liver segments not adequately drained by a remaining major hepatic vein. Four of these six patients required the use of Gore-Tex (W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Newark, DE) interposition grafts. In the 10 other cases the entire venous outflow from the remnant liver was reconstructed or reimplanted into the inferior vena cava primarily (n = 8) or using segments of the portal vein from the resected side of the liver as a graft (n = 2). Ex-vivo procedures with the use of veno-venous bypass were required in two cases and in-situ cold perfusion of the liver was used in one case. Results: There were two perioperative deaths (12%). One patient died of liver failure 3 weeks after right trisegmentectomy with reconstruction of the left hepatic vein and one patient died at 3 months after resection due to sepsis from a segment of small bowel that perforated into a diaphragmatic hernia. Four patients had evidence of postoperative liver failure that resolved with supportive management and one patient required temporary dialysis. All vascular reconstructions were patent at last followup. With median followup of 23 months, 3 patients have died of recurrent malignancy at 14, 18 and 30 months, while an additional patient went on to die of progressive liver failure at 22 months. Actuarial 1 and 3 year survival was 88% and 50% respectively. Conclusion: Hepatic vein involvement by hepatic malignancy does not necessarily preclude resection. Liver resection with reconstruction of the hepatic veins can be performed in selected cases. The increased risk associated with the procedure appears to be balanced by the possible benefits, particularly when the lack of alternative curative approaches is considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-858
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume235
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatic Veins
Liver
Neoplasms
Liver Failure
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Hepatoblastoma
Transplants
Diaphragmatic Hernia
Cholangiocarcinoma
Inferior Vena Cava
Portal Vein
Liver Transplantation
Blood Vessels
Dialysis
Sepsis
Fibrosis
Perfusion
Tissue Donors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Hemming, A. W., Reed, A. I., Langham, M., Fujita, S., Van Der Werf, W. J., & Howard, R. J. (2002). Hepatic vein reconstruction for resection of hepatic tumors. Annals of surgery, 235(6), 850-858. https://doi.org/10.1097/00000658-200206000-00013

Hepatic vein reconstruction for resection of hepatic tumors. / Hemming, Alan W.; Reed, Alan I.; Langham, Max; Fujita, Shiro; Van Der Werf, Willem J.; Howard, Richard J.

In: Annals of surgery, Vol. 235, No. 6, 03.06.2002, p. 850-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hemming, AW, Reed, AI, Langham, M, Fujita, S, Van Der Werf, WJ & Howard, RJ 2002, 'Hepatic vein reconstruction for resection of hepatic tumors', Annals of surgery, vol. 235, no. 6, pp. 850-858. https://doi.org/10.1097/00000658-200206000-00013
Hemming AW, Reed AI, Langham M, Fujita S, Van Der Werf WJ, Howard RJ. Hepatic vein reconstruction for resection of hepatic tumors. Annals of surgery. 2002 Jun 3;235(6):850-858. https://doi.org/10.1097/00000658-200206000-00013
Hemming, Alan W. ; Reed, Alan I. ; Langham, Max ; Fujita, Shiro ; Van Der Werf, Willem J. ; Howard, Richard J. / Hepatic vein reconstruction for resection of hepatic tumors. In: Annals of surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 235, No. 6. pp. 850-858.
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abstract = "Summary Background Data: Involvement of the hepatic veins requiring reconstruction has traditionally been considered a contraindication to resection for advanced tumors of the liver because the surgical risks are high and the long-term prognosis poor. Recent advances in liver surgery gleaned from split and live donor liver transplantation that necessitate hepatic vein reconstruction can be applied to hepatic resection in some cases. Methods: Sixteen patients who underwent hepatic resection requiring hepatic vein reconstruction from 1996-2001 were reviewed. The mean age was 43 years (range 2-61). Nine patients were resected for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), five patients for colorectal metastases, and one patient each for hepatoblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma. In six patients with HCC and cirrhosis, the right hepatic vein was reconstructed to provide venous outflow to liver segments not adequately drained by a remaining major hepatic vein. Four of these six patients required the use of Gore-Tex (W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Newark, DE) interposition grafts. In the 10 other cases the entire venous outflow from the remnant liver was reconstructed or reimplanted into the inferior vena cava primarily (n = 8) or using segments of the portal vein from the resected side of the liver as a graft (n = 2). Ex-vivo procedures with the use of veno-venous bypass were required in two cases and in-situ cold perfusion of the liver was used in one case. Results: There were two perioperative deaths (12{\%}). One patient died of liver failure 3 weeks after right trisegmentectomy with reconstruction of the left hepatic vein and one patient died at 3 months after resection due to sepsis from a segment of small bowel that perforated into a diaphragmatic hernia. Four patients had evidence of postoperative liver failure that resolved with supportive management and one patient required temporary dialysis. All vascular reconstructions were patent at last followup. With median followup of 23 months, 3 patients have died of recurrent malignancy at 14, 18 and 30 months, while an additional patient went on to die of progressive liver failure at 22 months. Actuarial 1 and 3 year survival was 88{\%} and 50{\%} respectively. Conclusion: Hepatic vein involvement by hepatic malignancy does not necessarily preclude resection. Liver resection with reconstruction of the hepatic veins can be performed in selected cases. The increased risk associated with the procedure appears to be balanced by the possible benefits, particularly when the lack of alternative curative approaches is considered.",
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AU - Howard, Richard J.

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N2 - Summary Background Data: Involvement of the hepatic veins requiring reconstruction has traditionally been considered a contraindication to resection for advanced tumors of the liver because the surgical risks are high and the long-term prognosis poor. Recent advances in liver surgery gleaned from split and live donor liver transplantation that necessitate hepatic vein reconstruction can be applied to hepatic resection in some cases. Methods: Sixteen patients who underwent hepatic resection requiring hepatic vein reconstruction from 1996-2001 were reviewed. The mean age was 43 years (range 2-61). Nine patients were resected for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), five patients for colorectal metastases, and one patient each for hepatoblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma. In six patients with HCC and cirrhosis, the right hepatic vein was reconstructed to provide venous outflow to liver segments not adequately drained by a remaining major hepatic vein. Four of these six patients required the use of Gore-Tex (W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Newark, DE) interposition grafts. In the 10 other cases the entire venous outflow from the remnant liver was reconstructed or reimplanted into the inferior vena cava primarily (n = 8) or using segments of the portal vein from the resected side of the liver as a graft (n = 2). Ex-vivo procedures with the use of veno-venous bypass were required in two cases and in-situ cold perfusion of the liver was used in one case. Results: There were two perioperative deaths (12%). One patient died of liver failure 3 weeks after right trisegmentectomy with reconstruction of the left hepatic vein and one patient died at 3 months after resection due to sepsis from a segment of small bowel that perforated into a diaphragmatic hernia. Four patients had evidence of postoperative liver failure that resolved with supportive management and one patient required temporary dialysis. All vascular reconstructions were patent at last followup. With median followup of 23 months, 3 patients have died of recurrent malignancy at 14, 18 and 30 months, while an additional patient went on to die of progressive liver failure at 22 months. Actuarial 1 and 3 year survival was 88% and 50% respectively. Conclusion: Hepatic vein involvement by hepatic malignancy does not necessarily preclude resection. Liver resection with reconstruction of the hepatic veins can be performed in selected cases. The increased risk associated with the procedure appears to be balanced by the possible benefits, particularly when the lack of alternative curative approaches is considered.

AB - Summary Background Data: Involvement of the hepatic veins requiring reconstruction has traditionally been considered a contraindication to resection for advanced tumors of the liver because the surgical risks are high and the long-term prognosis poor. Recent advances in liver surgery gleaned from split and live donor liver transplantation that necessitate hepatic vein reconstruction can be applied to hepatic resection in some cases. Methods: Sixteen patients who underwent hepatic resection requiring hepatic vein reconstruction from 1996-2001 were reviewed. The mean age was 43 years (range 2-61). Nine patients were resected for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), five patients for colorectal metastases, and one patient each for hepatoblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma. In six patients with HCC and cirrhosis, the right hepatic vein was reconstructed to provide venous outflow to liver segments not adequately drained by a remaining major hepatic vein. Four of these six patients required the use of Gore-Tex (W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Newark, DE) interposition grafts. In the 10 other cases the entire venous outflow from the remnant liver was reconstructed or reimplanted into the inferior vena cava primarily (n = 8) or using segments of the portal vein from the resected side of the liver as a graft (n = 2). Ex-vivo procedures with the use of veno-venous bypass were required in two cases and in-situ cold perfusion of the liver was used in one case. Results: There were two perioperative deaths (12%). One patient died of liver failure 3 weeks after right trisegmentectomy with reconstruction of the left hepatic vein and one patient died at 3 months after resection due to sepsis from a segment of small bowel that perforated into a diaphragmatic hernia. Four patients had evidence of postoperative liver failure that resolved with supportive management and one patient required temporary dialysis. All vascular reconstructions were patent at last followup. With median followup of 23 months, 3 patients have died of recurrent malignancy at 14, 18 and 30 months, while an additional patient went on to die of progressive liver failure at 22 months. Actuarial 1 and 3 year survival was 88% and 50% respectively. Conclusion: Hepatic vein involvement by hepatic malignancy does not necessarily preclude resection. Liver resection with reconstruction of the hepatic veins can be performed in selected cases. The increased risk associated with the procedure appears to be balanced by the possible benefits, particularly when the lack of alternative curative approaches is considered.

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