Hepatitis C and neutropenia

Vivien A. Sheehan, Alva Weir, Bradford Waters

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review describes the pathogenesis and therapeutic implications of neutropenia in patients with hepatitis C. RECENT FINDINGS: Mild-to-moderate neutropenia is increasingly recognized as the hepatitis C population has caused increased cirrhosis. Multiple mechanisms for the neutropenia have been postulated, with recent evidence pointing toward a combination of hypersplenism, autoimmunity, and direct viral infection of bone marrow cells. Advances in antiviral therapy are associated with worsened neutropenia and dose modification. Severe neutropenia is underreported and is generally not associated with increased rates of infection. SUMMARY: Although neutropenia is common in hepatitis C patients it generally has a benign course and may not prohibit antiviral therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-63
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Hematology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Hepatitis C
Neutropenia
Antiviral Agents
Hypersplenism
Virus Diseases
Autoimmunity
Bone Marrow Cells
Fibrosis
Therapeutics
Infection
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology

Cite this

Hepatitis C and neutropenia. / Sheehan, Vivien A.; Weir, Alva; Waters, Bradford.

In: Current Opinion in Hematology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 58-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Sheehan, Vivien A. ; Weir, Alva ; Waters, Bradford. / Hepatitis C and neutropenia. In: Current Opinion in Hematology. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 58-63.
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