Hereditary and environmental influences on blood pressure values of premenopausal women and their college-age daughters

R. L. Hancock, Frances Tylavsky, R. Moore, J. J.B. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood pressure (BP) and environmental (dietary/lifestyle) variables were measured in 62 healthy normotensive pairs of premenopausal mothers (44.3 years) and their college-age consanguineous daughters (18.7 years) to estimate the relative contributions of genetic vs environmental factors on BP. As expected, the mothers had significantly higher systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures than the daughters (p < 0.004 and 0.012, respectively). Among the dietary/lifestyle variables measured, mothers were found to have significantly higher mean weight and body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.009 and 0.001, respectively), and significantly lower lean body mass (LBM) and calcium intake than their daughters (p < 0.0003 and 0.037, respectively). Significant correlations were found between mean BP of the mothers and their mean weight and BMI. No significant correlations existed for the daughters. The familial resemblances between BP of the mothers and daughters were relatively low, i.e., 0.14 for SBP and 0.19 for DBP. From these findings we conclude that the higher BP values with increased age among this healthy female population primarily result from an increase in BMI and a shift from lean to fat mass, as measured by midarm circumference. Our results suggest that environmental factors, i.e., excessive energy intake over time, accompanied by decreased physical activity, are primarily responsible for the greater indices of body fat and the higher BPs observed in this sample of healthy premenopausal women. Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index, BP = blood pressure, DBP = diastolic blood pressure, LBM = lean body mass, QFFQ = quantitative food frequency questionnaire, SBP = systolic blood pressure, SEM = standard error of the mean

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-382
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1991

Fingerprint

Nuclear Family
Blood Pressure
Body Mass Index
Mothers
Life Style
Weights and Measures
Energy Intake
Adipose Tissue
Fats
Exercise
Hypertension
Calcium
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Hereditary and environmental influences on blood pressure values of premenopausal women and their college-age daughters. / Hancock, R. L.; Tylavsky, Frances; Moore, R.; Anderson, J. J.B.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.08.1991, p. 376-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e928632b75d64acc88d955bf7b99c367,
title = "Hereditary and environmental influences on blood pressure values of premenopausal women and their college-age daughters",
abstract = "Blood pressure (BP) and environmental (dietary/lifestyle) variables were measured in 62 healthy normotensive pairs of premenopausal mothers (44.3 years) and their college-age consanguineous daughters (18.7 years) to estimate the relative contributions of genetic vs environmental factors on BP. As expected, the mothers had significantly higher systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures than the daughters (p < 0.004 and 0.012, respectively). Among the dietary/lifestyle variables measured, mothers were found to have significantly higher mean weight and body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.009 and 0.001, respectively), and significantly lower lean body mass (LBM) and calcium intake than their daughters (p < 0.0003 and 0.037, respectively). Significant correlations were found between mean BP of the mothers and their mean weight and BMI. No significant correlations existed for the daughters. The familial resemblances between BP of the mothers and daughters were relatively low, i.e., 0.14 for SBP and 0.19 for DBP. From these findings we conclude that the higher BP values with increased age among this healthy female population primarily result from an increase in BMI and a shift from lean to fat mass, as measured by midarm circumference. Our results suggest that environmental factors, i.e., excessive energy intake over time, accompanied by decreased physical activity, are primarily responsible for the greater indices of body fat and the higher BPs observed in this sample of healthy premenopausal women. Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index, BP = blood pressure, DBP = diastolic blood pressure, LBM = lean body mass, QFFQ = quantitative food frequency questionnaire, SBP = systolic blood pressure, SEM = standard error of the mean",
author = "Hancock, {R. L.} and Frances Tylavsky and R. Moore and Anderson, {J. J.B.}",
year = "1991",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/07315724.1991.10718166",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "376--382",
journal = "Journal of the American College of Nutrition",
issn = "0731-5724",
publisher = "American College Of Nutrition",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hereditary and environmental influences on blood pressure values of premenopausal women and their college-age daughters

AU - Hancock, R. L.

AU - Tylavsky, Frances

AU - Moore, R.

AU - Anderson, J. J.B.

PY - 1991/8/1

Y1 - 1991/8/1

N2 - Blood pressure (BP) and environmental (dietary/lifestyle) variables were measured in 62 healthy normotensive pairs of premenopausal mothers (44.3 years) and their college-age consanguineous daughters (18.7 years) to estimate the relative contributions of genetic vs environmental factors on BP. As expected, the mothers had significantly higher systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures than the daughters (p < 0.004 and 0.012, respectively). Among the dietary/lifestyle variables measured, mothers were found to have significantly higher mean weight and body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.009 and 0.001, respectively), and significantly lower lean body mass (LBM) and calcium intake than their daughters (p < 0.0003 and 0.037, respectively). Significant correlations were found between mean BP of the mothers and their mean weight and BMI. No significant correlations existed for the daughters. The familial resemblances between BP of the mothers and daughters were relatively low, i.e., 0.14 for SBP and 0.19 for DBP. From these findings we conclude that the higher BP values with increased age among this healthy female population primarily result from an increase in BMI and a shift from lean to fat mass, as measured by midarm circumference. Our results suggest that environmental factors, i.e., excessive energy intake over time, accompanied by decreased physical activity, are primarily responsible for the greater indices of body fat and the higher BPs observed in this sample of healthy premenopausal women. Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index, BP = blood pressure, DBP = diastolic blood pressure, LBM = lean body mass, QFFQ = quantitative food frequency questionnaire, SBP = systolic blood pressure, SEM = standard error of the mean

AB - Blood pressure (BP) and environmental (dietary/lifestyle) variables were measured in 62 healthy normotensive pairs of premenopausal mothers (44.3 years) and their college-age consanguineous daughters (18.7 years) to estimate the relative contributions of genetic vs environmental factors on BP. As expected, the mothers had significantly higher systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures than the daughters (p < 0.004 and 0.012, respectively). Among the dietary/lifestyle variables measured, mothers were found to have significantly higher mean weight and body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.009 and 0.001, respectively), and significantly lower lean body mass (LBM) and calcium intake than their daughters (p < 0.0003 and 0.037, respectively). Significant correlations were found between mean BP of the mothers and their mean weight and BMI. No significant correlations existed for the daughters. The familial resemblances between BP of the mothers and daughters were relatively low, i.e., 0.14 for SBP and 0.19 for DBP. From these findings we conclude that the higher BP values with increased age among this healthy female population primarily result from an increase in BMI and a shift from lean to fat mass, as measured by midarm circumference. Our results suggest that environmental factors, i.e., excessive energy intake over time, accompanied by decreased physical activity, are primarily responsible for the greater indices of body fat and the higher BPs observed in this sample of healthy premenopausal women. Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index, BP = blood pressure, DBP = diastolic blood pressure, LBM = lean body mass, QFFQ = quantitative food frequency questionnaire, SBP = systolic blood pressure, SEM = standard error of the mean

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026408831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026408831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/07315724.1991.10718166

DO - 10.1080/07315724.1991.10718166

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 376

EP - 382

JO - Journal of the American College of Nutrition

JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition

SN - 0731-5724

IS - 4

ER -