Heritability of craniometric and occlusal variables

A longitudinal sib analysis

Edward Harris, Michelle G. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There has long been interest in the inheritance of malocclusion, but few studies have distinguished between skeletal (craniometric) variables and occlusal, tooth-based variables (e.g., anterior irregularity, rotations, displacements). This study was based on serial assessments of untreated persons in 30 sibships from 4 years (full deciduous dentition) to 20 years of age (full permanent dentition) in the Bolton-Brush Growth Studies of Ohio. Results define a clear dichotomy: craniometric variables (k = 29) typically show significant additive components of variance; correlations increase from age 4 to age 20; and correlations average 0.43 at adulthood. Tooth-based variables of position and relationship (k = 21) reach significance only occasionally; correlations decrease with age to the extent that few variables for subjects at age 20 have a correlation significantly different from zero. In contrast to craniometric variables, which have high heritabilities, almost all of the occlusal variability is acquired rather than inherited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-268
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume99
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Tooth
Permanent Dentition
Deciduous Tooth
Malocclusion
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Heritability of craniometric and occlusal variables : A longitudinal sib analysis. / Harris, Edward; Johnson, Michelle G.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 99, No. 3, 01.01.1991, p. 258-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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