High-dose versus low-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor treatment for bleeding peptic ulcers

Grigorios I. Leontiadis, Colin Howden, Alan N. Barkun

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evaluation of: Liu N, Liu L, Zhang H et al. Effect of intravenous proton pump inhibitor regimens and timing of endoscopy on clinical outcomes of peptic ulcer bleeding. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 27(9), 1473-1479 (2012). Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common medical emergency associated with significant mortality and healthcare costs. All recent guidelines agree on the beneficial role of proton pump inhibitor treatment, but there is still controversy regarding the optimal dose and route of administration of proton pump inhibitors. The evaluated article reports on a large, single-center randomized controlled trial that compared the clinical efficacy of a low-dose twice-daily intravenous bolus regimen with a high-dose continuous intravenous infusion regimen in 875 patients with acute bleeding from peptic ulcers. The high-dose regimen was associated with significant reductions in rebleeding, blood transfusion requirements and length of hospital stay. There was no demonstrable difference in mortality or the need for endoscopic hemostatic treatment or surgery. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the evaluated article, as well as the implications for clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-677
Number of pages3
JournalExpert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Proton Pump Inhibitors
Peptic Ulcer
Hemorrhage
Length of Stay
Mortality
Hemostatics
Intravenous Infusions
Blood Transfusion
Health Care Costs
Endoscopy
Emergencies
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Guidelines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

High-dose versus low-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor treatment for bleeding peptic ulcers. / Leontiadis, Grigorios I.; Howden, Colin; Barkun, Alan N.

In: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 6, No. 6, 01.12.2012, p. 675-677.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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