High-risk obstetrical call center

a model for regions with limited access to care

Sarah Rhoads, Hari Eswaran, Christian E. Lynch, Songthip T. Ounpraseuth, Everett F. Magann, Curtis L. Lowery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: High-risk obstetrical care can be challenging for women in rural states with limited access. Materials and methods: Data were evaluated from 62,342 obstetrical calls from pregnant and postpartum patients within rural Arkansas to a nurse call center. Call center nurses provided triage using evidence-based guidelines to patients across the state. Data were extracted and analyzed using retrospective data collection and descriptive statistical methods. Results: Women had an average maternal age of 28 years old, average weeks gestation was 27.4, over half had Medicaid 32,513 (52.15%), and the greatest percentage were in their first pregnancy 14,232 (34.1%). The greatest percentage of calls resulted in a recommendation to come to the hospital to be evaluated 25,894 (41.54%) followed by advice with no prescription given 19,442 (31.19%). The most frequent guidelines used included preterm labor 5114 (8.24%) followed by abdominal pain >20 weeks 4,518 (7.28%). Conclusions: A centralized obstetrical nurse call center model, including 24/7 availability, using triage software for obstetrical care, with experienced labor and delivery nurses to answer and respond to calls and secondary triage performed by OB/GYN physicians or Advance Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) has the potential of improving access to obstetric care in rural areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-865
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

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Nurses
Triage
Guidelines
Pregnancy
Premature Obstetric Labor
Maternal Age
Medicaid
Postpartum Period
Abdominal Pain
Obstetrics
Prescriptions
Software
Call Centers
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

High-risk obstetrical call center : a model for regions with limited access to care. / Rhoads, Sarah; Eswaran, Hari; Lynch, Christian E.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Magann, Everett F.; Lowery, Curtis L.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 7, 03.04.2018, p. 857-865.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhoads, Sarah ; Eswaran, Hari ; Lynch, Christian E. ; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T. ; Magann, Everett F. ; Lowery, Curtis L. / High-risk obstetrical call center : a model for regions with limited access to care. In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 857-865.
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