Histomorphometric comparison of implant anchorage for two types of dental implants after 3 and 6 months' healing in baboon jaws

Alan B. Carr, Peter E. Larsen, David Gerard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Statement of problem. A complete understanding of dental implant prognosis requires better knowledge of the bone anatomy after implant healing. Such baseline data are necessary to compare against load-induced changes in anatomy. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to describe and compare measures of implant support (percentage [%] integration and percentage [%] bone area) for various implants in baboon jaws after healing times of 3 and 6 months. Material and methods. Commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and titanium alloy (Ti-alloy) screw-shaped implants were placed in the posterior jaws of 9 female baboons after 2 months of postextraction healing. Specimens were harvested after 3 months (5 baboons: 8 cpTi, 7 Ti-alloy) and after 6 months (4 baboons: 8 cpTi, 8 Ti-alloy). Each implant provided 6 polished horizontal sections for data collection, which was accomplished from digitized images with the IMAGE analysis system (reliability at 1.6%). Three- and six-month data for each parameter were compared with the use of ANOVA (P<.01). Results. The results revealed a significant increase in the % integration (cpTi 39.1 to 56.2; Ti-alloy 40.0 to 55.2) and the % bone area (cpTi 38.8 to 47.9; Ti-alloy 38.9 to 49.2) from 3 to 6 months for both implants. This significant increase was also true for comparisons by jaw for each implant material (P<.01 for overall and by jaw comparisons). Conclusion. A time-dependent increase in jawbone anchorage was measured in this nonhuman primate population, and it was shown that the 6-month maxillary data were comparable to the 3-month mandibular data. These results lend support to the clinical strategy of waiting longer to load implants in the maxilla. (J Prosthet Dent 2001;85:276-80.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-280
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Dental Implants
Papio
Titanium
Jaw
Bone and Bones
Anatomy
Maxilla
Primates
Analysis of Variance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Histomorphometric comparison of implant anchorage for two types of dental implants after 3 and 6 months' healing in baboon jaws. / Carr, Alan B.; Larsen, Peter E.; Gerard, David.

In: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol. 85, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 276-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Statement of problem. A complete understanding of dental implant prognosis requires better knowledge of the bone anatomy after implant healing. Such baseline data are necessary to compare against load-induced changes in anatomy. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to describe and compare measures of implant support (percentage [{\%}] integration and percentage [{\%}] bone area) for various implants in baboon jaws after healing times of 3 and 6 months. Material and methods. Commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and titanium alloy (Ti-alloy) screw-shaped implants were placed in the posterior jaws of 9 female baboons after 2 months of postextraction healing. Specimens were harvested after 3 months (5 baboons: 8 cpTi, 7 Ti-alloy) and after 6 months (4 baboons: 8 cpTi, 8 Ti-alloy). Each implant provided 6 polished horizontal sections for data collection, which was accomplished from digitized images with the IMAGE analysis system (reliability at 1.6{\%}). Three- and six-month data for each parameter were compared with the use of ANOVA (P<.01). Results. The results revealed a significant increase in the {\%} integration (cpTi 39.1 to 56.2; Ti-alloy 40.0 to 55.2) and the {\%} bone area (cpTi 38.8 to 47.9; Ti-alloy 38.9 to 49.2) from 3 to 6 months for both implants. This significant increase was also true for comparisons by jaw for each implant material (P<.01 for overall and by jaw comparisons). Conclusion. A time-dependent increase in jawbone anchorage was measured in this nonhuman primate population, and it was shown that the 6-month maxillary data were comparable to the 3-month mandibular data. These results lend support to the clinical strategy of waiting longer to load implants in the maxilla. (J Prosthet Dent 2001;85:276-80.).",
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