History of sport participation in relation to obesity and related health behaviors in women

Catherine M. Alfano, Robert Klesges, David M. Murray, Bettina M. Beech, Barbara S. McClanahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Organized sport participation in youth is a common form of physical activity; yet, little is known about how it is associated with adult obesity and related health behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a history of youth sport participation was related to adult obesity, physical activity, and dietary intake among women. Methods. Participating women (209 African American, 277 Caucasian; ages 18-39), recruited from the community, completed laboratory measures, a paper and pencil survey assessing past sport participation and current physical activity level, and dietary records. Results. Linear regression revealed that a history of sport participation predicted lower adult body mass index and higher total and sport activity levels for both ethnic groups and higher work-related physical activity among Caucasians (all P < 0.001). Past sports participation did not predict dietary intake. Conclusions. The results suggest that girls' participation in sports may lay the foundation for adult health and health behaviors and that sports participation could be an important component of obesity prevention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-89
Number of pages8
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Health Behavior
Sports
Obesity
Exercise
Diet Records
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Alfano, C. M., Klesges, R., Murray, D. M., Beech, B. M., & McClanahan, B. S. (2002). History of sport participation in relation to obesity and related health behaviors in women. Preventive Medicine, 34(1), 82-89. https://doi.org/10.1006/pmed.2001.0963

History of sport participation in relation to obesity and related health behaviors in women. / Alfano, Catherine M.; Klesges, Robert; Murray, David M.; Beech, Bettina M.; McClanahan, Barbara S.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 82-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alfano, CM, Klesges, R, Murray, DM, Beech, BM & McClanahan, BS 2002, 'History of sport participation in relation to obesity and related health behaviors in women', Preventive Medicine, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 82-89. https://doi.org/10.1006/pmed.2001.0963
Alfano, Catherine M. ; Klesges, Robert ; Murray, David M. ; Beech, Bettina M. ; McClanahan, Barbara S. / History of sport participation in relation to obesity and related health behaviors in women. In: Preventive Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 82-89.
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