Hoechst 33258, distamycin A, and high mobility group protein I (HMG-I) compete for binding to mouse satellite DNA

Marko Radic, Michael Saghbini, Terry S. Elton, Raymond Reeves, Barbara A. Hamkalo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The experiments described were designed to test the hypothesis that the (A+T)-specific DNA binding ligands Hoechst 33258 and distamycin A affect the condensation of mouse centromeric heterochromatin by competing for binding to satellite DNA with one or more chromosomal proteins. The studies focused on the nonhistone chromosomal protein HMG-I since its binding properties predict it would be a target for competition. Gel mobility shift assays show that HMG-I forms specific complexes with satellite DNA and that the formation of these complexes is competed for by both Hoechst and distamycin. In addition, methidium propyl EDTA Fe(II) [MPE Fe(II)] footprints of ligand-satellite DNA complexes showed essentially the same protection pattern for both drugs and a similar, but not identical, HMG-I footprint. If these in vitro results reflect the in vivo situation then the incomplete condensation of centromeric heterochromatin observed when mouse cells are grown in the presence of either chemical ligand could be a consequence of competition for binding of HMG-I (and possibly other proteins) to satellite DNA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)602-608
Number of pages7
JournalChromosoma
Volume101
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

High Mobility Group Proteins
Satellite DNA
Bisbenzimidazole
Heterochromatin
Ligands
Protein Footprinting
Non Histone Chromosomal Proteins
Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay
Proteins
Gels
stallimycin
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics

Cite this

Hoechst 33258, distamycin A, and high mobility group protein I (HMG-I) compete for binding to mouse satellite DNA. / Radic, Marko; Saghbini, Michael; Elton, Terry S.; Reeves, Raymond; Hamkalo, Barbara A.

In: Chromosoma, Vol. 101, No. 10, 01.10.1992, p. 602-608.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Radic, Marko ; Saghbini, Michael ; Elton, Terry S. ; Reeves, Raymond ; Hamkalo, Barbara A. / Hoechst 33258, distamycin A, and high mobility group protein I (HMG-I) compete for binding to mouse satellite DNA. In: Chromosoma. 1992 ; Vol. 101, No. 10. pp. 602-608.
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