Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit

Erin Parrish Reade, Gregory A. Talbott, Mark Rowin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Hospital-acquired infections are an increasingly recognized problem within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Within the PICU, the patient population is exposed to an environment known for invasive procedures, monitoring and potential close proximity to others with infectious processes. Additionally, the PICU patients often have factors that affect their immune status including young age, chronic immunocompromised states, chronic stress, poor nutrition and prolonged immobility. Development of catheter-associated blood stream inections, ventilator-associated pneumonias, device-associated urinary tract infections and surgical site infections is an ongoing issue. Within the PICU environment, catheter-associated blood stream infections are the most common nosocomial infection, while ventilatorassociated pneumonias have the highest mortality. As PICU staff realize the impact on patient morbidity and mortality caused by hospital-acquired infections, measures that focus on infection control are becoming an increasingly important component of pediatric critical care. The best current approach for preventing PICU-acquired infections centers on strict adherence to infection control policies, early discontinuation of invasive devices, prompt recogition of developing infections, and appropriate use of antibiotic therapy. Insight into the organisms responsible for and the pathogenesis of PICU-related infections are crucial components to eradicating these potentially preventable clinical problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Subtitle of host publicationVolume 3: Gastroenterological, Endocrine, Renal, Hematologic, Oncologic and Immune Systems
PublisherSpringer-Verlag London Ltd
Pages509-529
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781447164166
ISBN (Print)9781447164159
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Cross Infection
Infection Control
Infection
Catheters
Surgical Wound Infection
Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia
Equipment and Supplies
Mortality
Critical Care
Urinary Tract Infections
Pneumonia
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Morbidity
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Reade, E. P., Talbott, G. A., & Rowin, M. (2014). Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit. In Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Volume 3: Gastroenterological, Endocrine, Renal, Hematologic, Oncologic and Immune Systems (pp. 509-529). Springer-Verlag London Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-6416-6_33

Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit. / Reade, Erin Parrish; Talbott, Gregory A.; Rowin, Mark.

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Volume 3: Gastroenterological, Endocrine, Renal, Hematologic, Oncologic and Immune Systems. Springer-Verlag London Ltd, 2014. p. 509-529.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Reade, EP, Talbott, GA & Rowin, M 2014, Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit. in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Volume 3: Gastroenterological, Endocrine, Renal, Hematologic, Oncologic and Immune Systems. Springer-Verlag London Ltd, pp. 509-529. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-6416-6_33
Reade EP, Talbott GA, Rowin M. Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit. In Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Volume 3: Gastroenterological, Endocrine, Renal, Hematologic, Oncologic and Immune Systems. Springer-Verlag London Ltd. 2014. p. 509-529 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-6416-6_33
Reade, Erin Parrish ; Talbott, Gregory A. ; Rowin, Mark. / Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Volume 3: Gastroenterological, Endocrine, Renal, Hematologic, Oncologic and Immune Systems. Springer-Verlag London Ltd, 2014. pp. 509-529
@inbook{07358b2620954f7a997fab44ea933c67,
title = "Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit",
abstract = "Hospital-acquired infections are an increasingly recognized problem within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Within the PICU, the patient population is exposed to an environment known for invasive procedures, monitoring and potential close proximity to others with infectious processes. Additionally, the PICU patients often have factors that affect their immune status including young age, chronic immunocompromised states, chronic stress, poor nutrition and prolonged immobility. Development of catheter-associated blood stream inections, ventilator-associated pneumonias, device-associated urinary tract infections and surgical site infections is an ongoing issue. Within the PICU environment, catheter-associated blood stream infections are the most common nosocomial infection, while ventilatorassociated pneumonias have the highest mortality. As PICU staff realize the impact on patient morbidity and mortality caused by hospital-acquired infections, measures that focus on infection control are becoming an increasingly important component of pediatric critical care. The best current approach for preventing PICU-acquired infections centers on strict adherence to infection control policies, early discontinuation of invasive devices, prompt recogition of developing infections, and appropriate use of antibiotic therapy. Insight into the organisms responsible for and the pathogenesis of PICU-related infections are crucial components to eradicating these potentially preventable clinical problems.",
author = "Reade, {Erin Parrish} and Talbott, {Gregory A.} and Mark Rowin",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-4471-6416-6_33",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781447164159",
pages = "509--529",
booktitle = "Pediatric Critical Care Medicine",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag London Ltd",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Hospital-acquired infections and the pediatric intensive care unit

AU - Reade, Erin Parrish

AU - Talbott, Gregory A.

AU - Rowin, Mark

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Hospital-acquired infections are an increasingly recognized problem within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Within the PICU, the patient population is exposed to an environment known for invasive procedures, monitoring and potential close proximity to others with infectious processes. Additionally, the PICU patients often have factors that affect their immune status including young age, chronic immunocompromised states, chronic stress, poor nutrition and prolonged immobility. Development of catheter-associated blood stream inections, ventilator-associated pneumonias, device-associated urinary tract infections and surgical site infections is an ongoing issue. Within the PICU environment, catheter-associated blood stream infections are the most common nosocomial infection, while ventilatorassociated pneumonias have the highest mortality. As PICU staff realize the impact on patient morbidity and mortality caused by hospital-acquired infections, measures that focus on infection control are becoming an increasingly important component of pediatric critical care. The best current approach for preventing PICU-acquired infections centers on strict adherence to infection control policies, early discontinuation of invasive devices, prompt recogition of developing infections, and appropriate use of antibiotic therapy. Insight into the organisms responsible for and the pathogenesis of PICU-related infections are crucial components to eradicating these potentially preventable clinical problems.

AB - Hospital-acquired infections are an increasingly recognized problem within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Within the PICU, the patient population is exposed to an environment known for invasive procedures, monitoring and potential close proximity to others with infectious processes. Additionally, the PICU patients often have factors that affect their immune status including young age, chronic immunocompromised states, chronic stress, poor nutrition and prolonged immobility. Development of catheter-associated blood stream inections, ventilator-associated pneumonias, device-associated urinary tract infections and surgical site infections is an ongoing issue. Within the PICU environment, catheter-associated blood stream infections are the most common nosocomial infection, while ventilatorassociated pneumonias have the highest mortality. As PICU staff realize the impact on patient morbidity and mortality caused by hospital-acquired infections, measures that focus on infection control are becoming an increasingly important component of pediatric critical care. The best current approach for preventing PICU-acquired infections centers on strict adherence to infection control policies, early discontinuation of invasive devices, prompt recogition of developing infections, and appropriate use of antibiotic therapy. Insight into the organisms responsible for and the pathogenesis of PICU-related infections are crucial components to eradicating these potentially preventable clinical problems.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84948959582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84948959582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-4471-6416-6_33

DO - 10.1007/978-1-4471-6416-6_33

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781447164159

SP - 509

EP - 529

BT - Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

PB - Springer-Verlag London Ltd

ER -