Hospital adoption of interoperability functions

Michael P. Thompson, Ilana Yonas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The seamless transmission of patient health information across health care settings, commonly referred to as interoperability, is a focal point of federal electronic health record (EHR) incentive programs. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which interoperability functions outlined in Promoting Interoperability Stage 3 (PI3) requirements have been adopted by US hospitals, and barriers to interoperability. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2781 non-federal, acute-care hospitals responding to the 2015 American Hospital Association Information Technology (IT) Supplement survey. We described the percentage of hospitals that adopted PI3 functionalities, identified hospital characteristics associated with adoption, and compared barriers to interoperability between hospitals that have and have not adopted PI3 functionalities. Results: Only 16.7% of hospitals had adopted all six core functionalities required to meet PI3 objectives. Over 70% of hospitals had implemented at least four of six functionalities, while 1.8% implemented none. Major teaching (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.66), system affiliated (aOR=1.63), and regional health information exchange participating hospitals (aOR=1.86) were more likely to adopt PI3 functionalities, while for-profit hospitals (OR=0.11) were less likely. Hospitals that adopted PI3 functionalities more frequently reported experiencing barriers to interoperability, including the receiving provider's ability and interest to send/receive data. Conclusions: While only a small proportion of hospitals had implemented all six PI3 functionalities at the time the requirements were finalized, the vast majority had already implemented most of the required functionalities. Still, several barriers stand in the way of achieving seamless interoperability, many of which lie outside hospitals’ control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealthcare
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Odds Ratio
American Hospital Association
Aptitude
Electronic Health Records
Motivation
Teaching
Cross-Sectional Studies
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health Information Exchange

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Hospital adoption of interoperability functions. / Thompson, Michael P.; Yonas, Ilana.

In: Healthcare, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: The seamless transmission of patient health information across health care settings, commonly referred to as interoperability, is a focal point of federal electronic health record (EHR) incentive programs. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which interoperability functions outlined in Promoting Interoperability Stage 3 (PI3) requirements have been adopted by US hospitals, and barriers to interoperability. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2781 non-federal, acute-care hospitals responding to the 2015 American Hospital Association Information Technology (IT) Supplement survey. We described the percentage of hospitals that adopted PI3 functionalities, identified hospital characteristics associated with adoption, and compared barriers to interoperability between hospitals that have and have not adopted PI3 functionalities. Results: Only 16.7{\%} of hospitals had adopted all six core functionalities required to meet PI3 objectives. Over 70{\%} of hospitals had implemented at least four of six functionalities, while 1.8{\%} implemented none. Major teaching (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.66), system affiliated (aOR=1.63), and regional health information exchange participating hospitals (aOR=1.86) were more likely to adopt PI3 functionalities, while for-profit hospitals (OR=0.11) were less likely. Hospitals that adopted PI3 functionalities more frequently reported experiencing barriers to interoperability, including the receiving provider's ability and interest to send/receive data. Conclusions: While only a small proportion of hospitals had implemented all six PI3 functionalities at the time the requirements were finalized, the vast majority had already implemented most of the required functionalities. Still, several barriers stand in the way of achieving seamless interoperability, many of which lie outside hospitals’ control.",
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