How do mechanical responses at closing loop ends vary when loop position changes? A systematic analysis of vertical, T-, and L-loops

Paiboon Techalertpaisarn, Antheunis Versluis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Closing loops are used in orthodontics to apply forces on teeth and cause them to move in a desired direction. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of loop geometry and position on loop properties. Using finite element analysis, loop response was simulated for three closing loop designs (vertical, T-, and L-loop) at thirteen loop positions. Loop length and height were 14 and 10-mm, respectively. Loop properties (horizontal load/deflection, vertical force, and moment-to-force ratio M/F) on both ends were measured at 100 and 200. g force activation or when moving both ends 2-mm together. It was found that the pattern of changes in loop properties with loop position was similar for the vertical and T-loop. They reached their maximum M/F-ratios of 5.5 and 7.3, respectively, at the ends closest to 1/5 or 4/5 off-center loop positions. M/F-direction at an end changed when the loop was about 2/3 away (vertical loop) or 4/5 (T-loop). The L-loop behaved differently, reaching its maximum 8.7. M/F-ratio (200. g activation) when centered. M/F-direction only changed at the opposite end of the L-loop direction, and occurred when the loop was centered. This study showed that loop properties depended on loop shape, position and activation. The way properties changed with loop position depended on their designs. Clinicians should consider the specific characteristics of each loop configuration for desired tooth movements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-64
Number of pages7
JournalOral Science International
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

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Tooth Movement Techniques
Finite Element Analysis
Orthodontics
Tooth
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

How do mechanical responses at closing loop ends vary when loop position changes? A systematic analysis of vertical, T-, and L-loops. / Techalertpaisarn, Paiboon; Versluis, Antheunis.

In: Oral Science International, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.05.2013, p. 58-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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