How Does the Media Portray Neurosurgeons?

Mustafa Motiwala, Sonia Ajmera, Olutomi Akinduro, David Wallace, Sebastian P. Norrdahl, Andrew Schultz, Brittany Fraser, Hassan Saad, Melissa Justo, Pooja Dave, Vincent Nguyen, Brandy Vaughn, Lattimore Michael, Paul Klimo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: It is not unusual to find neurosurgeons in the news and entertainment. The present study examined the portrayal of neurosurgeons by major print and online media sources. Methods: Two search strategies identified articles from October 1, 2012 to October 1, 2017 containing the keyword “neurosurgeon.” The top 25 newspapers in the United States, determined by their circulation, were searched using the LexisNexis Academic or NewsBank databases; a layman's Google News search was used to collect online stories. Each identified article was evaluated to confirm the relevance and then examined for content. Relevant characteristics for each article and neurosurgeon were determined and analyzed. Results: Our searches returned 1005 articles comprising 561 unique stories about 203 different neurosurgeons. One particular neurosurgeon had 459 reports (45.7%). More articles were reported in 2015 (405; 40.3%) than any other single year. Most articles featured male neurosurgeons (879; 87.1%) and neurosurgeons who had been practicing for >20 years (636; 63.0%), with just 10 institutions accounting for the training of most of them (733; 72.6%). The articles were classified as positive (270; 26.9%), negative (356; 35.4%), or neutral (379; 37.7%) in terms of their reflection on the field of neurosurgery. The odds of a negative story were greater for male neurosurgeons, within 10 years of residency completion, and in a nonacademic position. Conclusions: Neurosurgeons are naturally subject to media coverage, and we must be cognizant that this predilection can serve as both an occupational advantage and an occupational hazard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e598-e605
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume122
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Neurosurgeons
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Neurosurgery
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Motiwala, M., Ajmera, S., Akinduro, O., Wallace, D., Norrdahl, S. P., Schultz, A., ... Klimo, P. (2019). How Does the Media Portray Neurosurgeons? World Neurosurgery, 122, e598-e605. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2018.10.110

How Does the Media Portray Neurosurgeons? / Motiwala, Mustafa; Ajmera, Sonia; Akinduro, Olutomi; Wallace, David; Norrdahl, Sebastian P.; Schultz, Andrew; Fraser, Brittany; Saad, Hassan; Justo, Melissa; Dave, Pooja; Nguyen, Vincent; Vaughn, Brandy; Michael, Lattimore; Klimo, Paul.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 122, 01.02.2019, p. e598-e605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Motiwala, M, Ajmera, S, Akinduro, O, Wallace, D, Norrdahl, SP, Schultz, A, Fraser, B, Saad, H, Justo, M, Dave, P, Nguyen, V, Vaughn, B, Michael, L & Klimo, P 2019, 'How Does the Media Portray Neurosurgeons?', World Neurosurgery, vol. 122, pp. e598-e605. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2018.10.110
Motiwala M, Ajmera S, Akinduro O, Wallace D, Norrdahl SP, Schultz A et al. How Does the Media Portray Neurosurgeons? World Neurosurgery. 2019 Feb 1;122:e598-e605. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2018.10.110
Motiwala, Mustafa ; Ajmera, Sonia ; Akinduro, Olutomi ; Wallace, David ; Norrdahl, Sebastian P. ; Schultz, Andrew ; Fraser, Brittany ; Saad, Hassan ; Justo, Melissa ; Dave, Pooja ; Nguyen, Vincent ; Vaughn, Brandy ; Michael, Lattimore ; Klimo, Paul. / How Does the Media Portray Neurosurgeons?. In: World Neurosurgery. 2019 ; Vol. 122. pp. e598-e605.
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title = "How Does the Media Portray Neurosurgeons?",
abstract = "Background: It is not unusual to find neurosurgeons in the news and entertainment. The present study examined the portrayal of neurosurgeons by major print and online media sources. Methods: Two search strategies identified articles from October 1, 2012 to October 1, 2017 containing the keyword “neurosurgeon.” The top 25 newspapers in the United States, determined by their circulation, were searched using the LexisNexis Academic or NewsBank databases; a layman's Google News search was used to collect online stories. Each identified article was evaluated to confirm the relevance and then examined for content. Relevant characteristics for each article and neurosurgeon were determined and analyzed. Results: Our searches returned 1005 articles comprising 561 unique stories about 203 different neurosurgeons. One particular neurosurgeon had 459 reports (45.7{\%}). More articles were reported in 2015 (405; 40.3{\%}) than any other single year. Most articles featured male neurosurgeons (879; 87.1{\%}) and neurosurgeons who had been practicing for >20 years (636; 63.0{\%}), with just 10 institutions accounting for the training of most of them (733; 72.6{\%}). The articles were classified as positive (270; 26.9{\%}), negative (356; 35.4{\%}), or neutral (379; 37.7{\%}) in terms of their reflection on the field of neurosurgery. The odds of a negative story were greater for male neurosurgeons, within 10 years of residency completion, and in a nonacademic position. Conclusions: Neurosurgeons are naturally subject to media coverage, and we must be cognizant that this predilection can serve as both an occupational advantage and an occupational hazard.",
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AU - Ajmera, Sonia

AU - Akinduro, Olutomi

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AU - Schultz, Andrew

AU - Fraser, Brittany

AU - Saad, Hassan

AU - Justo, Melissa

AU - Dave, Pooja

AU - Nguyen, Vincent

AU - Vaughn, Brandy

AU - Michael, Lattimore

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