How much weight gain occurs following smoking cessation? A comparison of weight gain using both continuous and point prevalence abstinence

Robert Klesges, Suzan E. Winders, Andrew W. Meyers, Linda H. Eck, Kenneth D. Ward, Cynthia M. Hultquist, Jo Anne W. Ray, William R. Shadish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

150 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Estimates of postcessation weight gain vary widely. This study determined the magnitude of weight gain in a cohort using both point prevalence and continuous abstinence criteria for cessation. Participants were 196 volunteers who participated in a smoking cessation program and who either continuously smoked (n = 118), were continuously abstinent (n = 51), or who were point prevalent abstinent (n = 27) (i.e., quit at the 1-year follow-up visit but not at others). Continuously abstinent participants gained over 13 lbs. (5.90 kg) at year, significantly more than continuously smoking (M = 2.4 lb.) and point prevalent abstinent participants (M = 6.7 lbs., or 3.04 kg). Individual growth curve analysis confirmed that weight gain and the rate of weight gain (pounds per month) were greater among continuously smoking participants and that these effects were independent of gender, baseline weight, smoking and dieting history, age, and education. Results suggest that studies using point prevalence abstinence to estimate postcessation weight gain may be underestimating postcessation weight gain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-291
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997

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Smoking Cessation
Weight Gain
Smoking
Volunteers
History
Education
Weights and Measures
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

How much weight gain occurs following smoking cessation? A comparison of weight gain using both continuous and point prevalence abstinence. / Klesges, Robert; Winders, Suzan E.; Meyers, Andrew W.; Eck, Linda H.; Ward, Kenneth D.; Hultquist, Cynthia M.; Ray, Jo Anne W.; Shadish, William R.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 65, No. 2, 01.04.1997, p. 286-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, Robert ; Winders, Suzan E. ; Meyers, Andrew W. ; Eck, Linda H. ; Ward, Kenneth D. ; Hultquist, Cynthia M. ; Ray, Jo Anne W. ; Shadish, William R. / How much weight gain occurs following smoking cessation? A comparison of weight gain using both continuous and point prevalence abstinence. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1997 ; Vol. 65, No. 2. pp. 286-291.
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