How nonclinical are community samples?

Idia Thurston, Jessica Curley, Sherecce Fields, Dimitra Kamboukos, Ariz Bojas, Vicky Phares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mental health services are underutilized in our society by both adults and children. This finding presents a potential problem for researchers conducting community-based research. Previous studies have demonstrated that community-based researchers frequently do not screen participants for the presence of psychopathology nor do they ascertain whether therapeutic services are currently utilized. The present study explored the prevalence of psychopathology and treatment involvement in a sample of families recruited from the community. Results indicated that a fifth of the participants in this community-based sample met diagnostic criteria for a psychiatric disorder or were in treatment for psychological difficulties at the time of recruitment for this study. Furthermore, mothers, fathers, and adolescents who met the criteria according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) for a psychological disorder had higher symptomatology than those who did not meet criteria. Methodological suggestions are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-420
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychopathology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Research Personnel
Psychology
Mental Health Services
Fathers
Psychiatry
Therapeutics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Mothers
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Thurston, I., Curley, J., Fields, S., Kamboukos, D., Bojas, A., & Phares, V. (2008). How nonclinical are community samples? Journal of Community Psychology, 36(4), 411-420. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.20223

How nonclinical are community samples? / Thurston, Idia; Curley, Jessica; Fields, Sherecce; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Bojas, Ariz; Phares, Vicky.

In: Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 36, No. 4, 01.05.2008, p. 411-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thurston, I, Curley, J, Fields, S, Kamboukos, D, Bojas, A & Phares, V 2008, 'How nonclinical are community samples?', Journal of Community Psychology, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 411-420. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.20223
Thurston I, Curley J, Fields S, Kamboukos D, Bojas A, Phares V. How nonclinical are community samples? Journal of Community Psychology. 2008 May 1;36(4):411-420. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.20223
Thurston, Idia ; Curley, Jessica ; Fields, Sherecce ; Kamboukos, Dimitra ; Bojas, Ariz ; Phares, Vicky. / How nonclinical are community samples?. In: Journal of Community Psychology. 2008 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 411-420.
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